001_CA230_Cover_FINAL2_MESC.inddWhen I launched Current Archaeology in 1967 I never thought that  we would ever reach issue 300. To my surprise, 12,000 pages and  more than 1,000 articles later, issue 300 is now upon us, and so  we have taken the opportunity to look back at the archaeology of  these past 48 years, and to think about the future.

We begin with some reflections on the launch of CA, and recollect some of  my favourite articles. We have then invited two of my fellow entrepreneurs to tell us  the secrets of how they began their unexpected careers, of how David Brown started  the Oxbow book-selling empire, and how Annabel Lawson set up Andante, one of  archaeology’s favourite travel companies.

And then, at the heart of the magazine, three of our leading archaeologists look  back at their careers. Francis Pryor tells us how he came to Peterborough, following  my throwaway remark in an early issue of CA, and set about rethinking all our  ideas about the Bronze Age. Martin Biddle tells us about Winchester, still probably  the biggest single excavation in British archaeology. And Michael Fulford tells us  how he excavated the Roman town of Silchester.

Finally may I say a big thank you to all those who have supported CA in the last  300 issues: to all those archaeologists who have told me about their excavations  and discoveries; and to you, our readers. I hope to
continue to amuse, stimulate, and occasionally even to  provoke you in the future, and I look forward to meeting  even more of you at our conference again this year.

Andrew Selkirk

 

IN THIS ISSUE:

 

FEATURES

 

CELEBRATING 300 ISSUES

Andrew reminisces; Friends of CA;  favourite Articles
Current Archaeology magazine has reported on almost half a century of excavations. For our 300th issue, Editor-in-Chief and founder Andrew Selkirk tells the story of how it all began, and reveals his favourite articles, while friends of the magazine describe how a passion for archaeology helped them to make new inroads into the past.


WHEN FRANCIS DUG THE FENS

A time teeming with innovation
How have perceptions of Britain’s Bronze Age changed since the 1960s? We explore game-changing work on the Peterborough Fens with Francis Pryor.


WINCHESTER UNCOVERED

Revisiting one of England’s greatest urban excavations
The Winchester excavations begun by Martin Biddle in 1961 saw the birth of many of the key techniques of modern urban excavation – and analysis of the project’s remarkable finds is still ongoing.


A LIFE ARCHAEOLOGICAL

From Fishbourne to 40 years at Silchester
With the long-running excavations at Silchester now at an end, we look back with Mike Fulford over an extraordinary Roman site, and how the hunt for its origins began.


NEWS

Racton Man: forging ahead; Unearthing the Lenborough Hoard; Beauty of the Bedale Hoard revealed; Found: Europe’s northernmost hacksilver hoard; Ravelrig: an Iron Age room with a view; Lost village uncovered in Shropshire; Rickets on board the Mary Rose

 

REGULARS

Context
Picture perfect: a spectacular mosaic from Sparsholt Roman villa

Conference
Latest details of  Current Archaeology Live! 2015,  including timetable updates, a bonus activity, and our Archaeology Fair.

Reviews
The Chiming of Crack’d Bells; Radiocarbon dating; Walk into the Dark Ages

Sherds
Chris Catling’s irreverent take on  heritage issues

Odd Socs
The Inn Sign Society

 

2 Comments

  1. Rebecca S. Bierman
    April 26, 2015 @ 1:09 am

    I loved the mosaic from the Sparsholt Roman Villa in Hampshire shown in the 300th issue. I loved it so much that I’d like to create a needlepoint hanging based on image on pages 50-51. The photo itself is undoubtedly covered under copyright law and I have no intention to violate that; is it possible, however, to get an image (without the problems of the two pages joining) from which I could chart a design? The image on page 5 is too small for enlarging to the size I would need to create the chart.

    The colors as well as the design details are incredible; creating a fabric image based on the late Mr. Johnston’s painting would be both challenging and rewarding for me. As I’m inclined to say, this is a project that would keep me off the streets and out of trouble–for some little while.

    Rebecca S. Bierman
    Columbia, Missouri, USA

    Reply

    • Carly Hilts
      July 6, 2015 @ 10:39 am

      Hi Rebecca, Carly Hilts (Assistant Editor) here – I’m on the case! Will email you shortly.

      Reply

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