RISE OF THE MEGA-HENGES

RISE OF THE MEGA-HENGES

It was long thought that huge and complex monuments like Mount Pleasant in Dorset had developed over many centuries – but new dating evidence suggests that the diverse elements of this site came together much faster than previously imagined, with intriguing implications for our understanding of these late Neolithic enclosures. Carly Hilts reports.

 

Review – Nazi Prisons in the British Isles: political prisoners during the German Occupation of Jersey and Guernsey 1940-1945
Review – Nazi Prisons in the British Isles: political prisoners during the German Occupation of Jersey and Guernsey 1940-1945
This is a welcome addition to the literature on confinement, a topic that has developed from a little-studied phenomenon into one of most vibrant areas within the subdiscipline of Conflict Archaeology. Gilly Carr has been a part of this through ...
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Heritage from Home – January
Heritage from Home – January
Even though most of the country is in lockdown there are still plenty of ways to get explore the past! Amy Brunskill has put together a selection of online resources for you to peruse from home ...
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RISE OF THE MEGA-HENGES
RISE OF THE MEGA-HENGES
It was long thought that huge and complex monuments like Mount Pleasant in Dorset had developed over many centuries – but new dating evidence suggests that the diverse elements of this site came together much faster than previously imagined, with ...
Read More
Excavating the CA archive: Yorkshire, part II
Excavating the CA archive: Yorkshire, part II
In my previous column (CA 370), I examined Yorkshire’s prehistoric archaeology. This month, I am moving forward chronologically to explore the Roman, Viking and Anglo-Saxon, late medieval, and modern archaeology of this region’s four counties. This is ground that I ...
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Science Notes – Parsing the properties of Egyptian purple pigments
Science Notes – Parsing the properties of Egyptian purple pigments
Between 30 BC and the 3rd century AD, during which period Egypt was a province of the Roman Empire, a practice developed of attaching a portrait of a mummified individual to their mummy wrappings. Approximately 1,100 of these paintings have ...
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Heritage from Home – January

Heritage from Home – January

Even though most of the country is in lockdown there are still plenty of ways to get explore the past! Amy Brunskill has put together a selection of online resources for you to peruse from home.
Read More

 

 

Dig into Shropshire’s past at Soulton Hall
PLEASE NOTE THE 2020 EXCAVATION SEASON HAS BEEN CANCELLED Help DigVentures investigate a rare 12th-13th ...
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Topographic Survey Training
Topographic survey training [Image: Mercian Archaeological Services CIC] In archaeology the ability to measure the ...
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Mercian Archaeological Services Post-Fieldwork Training School
As well as offering the best in archaeological training and support, the 2020 Field School ...
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Strata Florida Archaeology Field School
PLEASE NOTE: In light of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, it is with great sadness that ...
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Recent Issues

 

Think differently: think Archaeology!
Think differently: think Archaeology!
This month marks the second University Archaeology Day, following 2017’s successful inaugural event. Charlotte Frearson, Jennifer French, and Andrew Gardner ...
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Is there a future in studying the past?
Is there a future in studying the past?
Is this the time to pursue a course in archaeology? The word from the field that reaches the Current Archaeology ...
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Into the Light - CASPAR at UCL
Into the Light – CASPAR at UCL
Don Henson, Director of CASPAR (Centre for Audio-Visual Study and Practice in Archaeology) explains how an innovative new centre at ...
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University Guide
University Guide
A guide to all the major university archaeology departments in the UKHere we list all the major University departments that ...
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Distance Learning - Anytime Anywhere
Distance Learning – Anytime Anywhere
Distance learning can offer a valuable route into archaeological study for those who are unable, or just don't want to, ...
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Want to be a Digger? - Entering the world of commercial archaeology
Want to be a Digger? – Entering the world of commercial archaeology
Dr Andrew Fitzpatrick, Head of Communications, Wessex Archaeology offers us his insight and tips on getting onto the earchaeology career ...
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Walk the Timeline

Learn all about the archaeology of Britain from these easy-to-read cyber tours, specially adapted from articles in Current Archaeology.


Or try some of our other special features:

Edible Archaeology
Sutton Hoo
Hadrian’s Wall


500000 BC - Boxgrove
In a gravel pit at Boxgrove, just outside Chichester, the remains of a man have been discovered, half a million ...
2500 BC - The Clava Cairns
Burial chambers of the Neolithic In the Neolithic - the New Stone Age - the older you were, the more ...
Dover Boat
A large Bronze Age boat has recently been discovered at Dover. Keith Parfitt, of the Canterbury Archaeological Trust, reports ...
Castell Henllys
The Celts were warriors, and the most prominent remains of the Iron Age are the great hillforts, surrounded by banks ...
Snettisham
The great Iron Age hoards discovered at Snettisham in Norfolk form the richest Iron Age treasure ever discovered in this ...

 

Current Archaeology LIVE!

Each year Current Archaeology runs an annual conference to showcase the best of archaeology at home and abroad. We have a series of talks given by the country’s leading archaeologists, and we also present the annual Archaeology Awards.

Current Archaeology Live! is an annual two-day conference that tells you all you need to know about the latest discoveries from Britain and abroad. We hear from the foremost archaeological experts on recent finds and ground-breaking research – it is always an entertaining, stimulating and enjoyable event, attended by over 400 people every year.  In February 2020, we heard about a wealth of incredible new discoveries – including the fascinating recent results from Star Carr, the story of an Elizabethan theatre in London, new information about the skeletons of the Mary Rose, and the evidence for plague in Roman Britain.

The next event will be held on 26-27 February 2021 – save the date!

Find out more