CA215-1This month, we spend a lot of time up north. There’s a lot going on in the chilly wilds up there,  and we braved the cold to bring you profiles of York’s biggest excavation in the past 25 years,  as well as a newly opened reconstruction of a centurion’s house at South Shields. Additionally,  Andrew Selkirk profiles his trip along the Antonine Wall in Last Word and discusses the recent bid  for World Heritage status: is it worthy? We also go deep inside Silbury Hill and show you what the  tunnels were really like, and why it’s necessary to seal the mound forever.  By the way. we’re very busy here at CA getting ready for the Archaeology 2008 conference, which is  just around the corner. We hope to see you on 9-10 February at the British Museum!

 

SILBURY HILL: A LAST LOOK INSIDE
Silbury Hill is one of Britain’s most  enigmatic and impressive prehistoric  monuments. Plagued by structural  problems and frequent collapse as a  result of unsympathetic excavation and  tunnelling in the past, the landmark  mound was in serious danger. We take  you inside for a last look, and delve into  English Heritage’s newly completed  conservation project.

3D LASER SCANNING FOR HERITAGE: THE FUTURE OF THE PAST?
3D Laser Scanning has come a long  way since 1990 and is a regular, if still  changing, tool for archaeologists,  conservators and building specialists.  English Heritage Chief Archaeological  Advisor David Miles explains how  the fascinating technology has evolved,  and how it is changing the way we ‘see’  archaeology.

HUNGATE: THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF MODERN URBAN POVERTY
Seebohm Rowntree’s revoltionary  1901 study of poverty and town life in  York inspired decades of social reform  to eradicate poverty and construct a  welfare state. Hungate, the area of  Rowntree’s study, is today one of the  most overlooked parts of historic  York. However, all that is changing as  archaeologists embark on  a five-year project to excavate  the slums and reveal  past chapters of the buried  history of Hungate.

SOUTH SHIELDS: REBUILDING A ROMAN FORT
What was a Roman centurion’s house  like? Visitors to Arbeia Roman Fort at  South Shields can now wander around  a new, full-size reconstruction of one.  Roman emperor Septimius Severus’  death-bed advice to his two sons was  ‘Look after the soldiers, boys!’, and in  this surprisingly large and luxurious  structure it is easy to see how officers  were especially favoured.

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