Wales

Offa's Dyke

Review – Offa’s Dyke: landscape and hegemony in 8th-century Britain

Keith Ray and Ian Bapty Windgather Press, £29.95 ISBN 978-1905119356 Review George Nash This welcome volume provides the reader with a detailed and comprehensive history of one of the most important early medieval earthworks in the British Isles. The 240km earthwork bank and ditch of Offa’s Dyke would have been a massive undertaking in terms […]

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Heathery livrocky land: rethinking the stones of Neolithic Pembrokeshire

In a major new volume on the archaeology of Pembrokeshire, Tim Darvill argues that monument typologies do not help us understand how people viewed rocks and the landscape in the past. We need to think less like archaeologists and start asking questions about the meaning of stone and what these monuments might have signified to […]

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Current Archaeology 324

How should we study ancient stone monuments? In the past, great ingenuity has been expended on cataloguing them according to ever more intricate typologies. Now a survey of Neolithic monuments in Pembrokeshire is applying simpler classifications and focusing on what these edifices meant to the communities that raised them. The results raise questions about how efforts to clear the first farming land […]

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Current Archaeology 321

Legend has it that the Rothwell charnel chapel was discovered when a grave digger tumbled into an underground vault stacked with bones. This alarming incident brought to light a rare example of an intact medieval ossuary in England. Our cover feature explores why the dead were assembled in this manner, and how common the practice was. […]

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Current Archaeology 319

We now know that disaster swiftly struck Must Farm. Construction may not even have been complete when the flames took hold, and it is probable that the settlement was gutted within a year of being founded. For the inhabitants, the loss of their homes and possessions must have been devastating, but the archaeological windfall has […]

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Current Archaeology 318

Neolithic tombs are often seen as ‘houses for the dead’. Striking similarities between the residences of the living and repositories for the deceased have long suggested a symbolic link, but could it be the other way round? Evidence from Orkney suggests that the departed were being laid to rest in their cairns for about 300 […]

Offa's Dyke Centre featured

Offa’s Dyke Association

An independent voluntary organisation spreading the word about Offa’s Dyke and the history and landscape of the England-Wales border. The association seeks to promote and protect the 1200-year-old Offa’s Dyke and the Offa’s Dyke Path, a National Trail 177 miles long. They manage the Offa’s Dyke Centre at Knighton which has a free public exhibition, a shop […]

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Early Medieval Wales Archaeology Research Group

For over 20 years EMWARG has promoted research and debate on the archaeology of Early Medieval Wales through regular lecture days and colloquia. The group continues to welcome membership from students and academics, professional archaeologists and interested lay persons. EMWARG is currently organised by Nancy Edwards (Professor of Medieval Archaeology, Bangor University) and Marion Shiner […]

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Wales in the Vanguard: Pioneering protection of the past

Fortieth birthdays rarely pass without a moment of introspection, but Wales shows no sign of resting on its laurels as its Archaeological Trusts notch up that anniversary. Instead, the country is blazing a trail through the landscape of heritage protection. Chris Catling casts his eye over how Wales got to where it is today, and […]

Welsh Mines Society

For the study of the history, archaeology etc of welsh mining. Two weekend field trips annually. Newsletter and lectures. Contact Details Web: www.welshmines.org

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