Neolithic

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Current Archaeology 334

The discovery of London’s Temple of Mithras enthralled the public and inspired a generation of archaeologists. In 1954, tens of thousands queued for hours to see the newly uncovered Roman remains. Today, the temple has opened to visitors once more, reconstructed close to its original location – CA went along to find out more. Around […]

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Feeding the ‘builders of Stonehenge’

A newly opened exhibition at Stonehenge documents the diet of the community thought to have been responsible for erecting the main phase of the monument – including the surprisingly far-flung origins of some of their food.

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Neolithic house discovered in Ayrshire

GUARD Archaeology Ltd has discovered what appears to be one of the oldest houses in East Ayrshire, dated to c.4000-3500 BC.   The post-holes of a rectangular building, measuring approximately 14m long by 8m across, were revealed in the countryside near Kilmarnock, during a multi-million pound Scottish Water project to upgrade water mains between Ayrshire and Glasgow, […]

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Wales’ earliest village?

Exploring a Neolithic neighbourhood at Llanfaethlu Since 2014, archaeological work at Llanfaethlu, on the north coast of Anglesey, has been revealing the remains of the first early Neolithic multi-house settlement to be found in north Wales. Catherine Rees and Matthew Jones explain further. When our work began at Llanfaethlu, the site had already been identified […]

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Revolutionising chronologies of Neolithic Orkney

Orkney has long been renowned for its wealth of well preserved Neolithic sites, such as Skara Brae, and it seems that much is known about the time and region. But a new study by a team at Historic England has set out to challenge our current understanding of the chronology of the period by compiling […]

Overview of site showing archaeologists working on Early Neolithic Houses

Neolithic house at Cata Sand

Braving the inter-tidal waves at at Cata Sand beach on Sanday, Orkney, archaeologists have uncovered the first ‘classic’ early Neolithic house to be discovered on the island. Dating from c.3400-3100 BC, the house’s remains comprise two construction layers, with internal structures ranging from a stone set hearth and various pits to partitioning walls. Its footprint […]

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Current Archaeology 328

Between 1974 and 1981 a remarkable campaign of excavations in Dublin exposed a swathe of the Viking town. From an archaeological perspective the conditions were perfect, with waterlogged layers preserving the vestiges of hundreds of houses and thousands of artefacts. But this was also a race against the clock, with public demonstrations buying more time […]

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Current Archaeology 327

Why were Pictish symbols carved into Trusty’s Hill, far to the south of where they usually occur? Investigation of a hillfort towering over the images reveals that the site developed into a prosperous centre in the 6th century AD, and may even have been at the heart of the lost kingdom of Rheged. If so, […]

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Current Archaeology 326

What are borders for? It is a question that has recently gone mainstream. Debate about ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ borders finds a parallel in attempts to determine whether Roman borders blocked or simply regulated movement. In this regard, the true nature of Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall remains a mystery. As the modern world is reminding us, though, the nature […]

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