Iron Age

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Current Archaeology 329

To step into Harmondsworth Barn is not just to enter a space so glorious that it was lauded as the ‘cathedral of Middlesex’ by Sir John Betjeman. It is also to experience a remarkably intact medieval interior. Among majestic oak trusses are opportunities to admire medieval technology that has weathered the centuries unaltered. After being […]

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Current Archaeology 327

Why were Pictish symbols carved into Trusty’s Hill, far to the south of where they usually occur? Investigation of a hillfort towering over the images reveals that the site developed into a prosperous centre in the 6th century AD, and may even have been at the heart of the lost kingdom of Rheged. If so, […]

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An Iron Age chariot burial

Excavating a square-barrow cemetery at Pocklington Recent work at Pocklington has exposed a remarkable Iron Age burial ground. As well as producing grave goods that have never been seen at such a site before, the cemetery is shedding new light on the rituals accompanying burial rites. Paula Ware told Matthew Symonds about an excavation that […]

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Current Archaeology 326

What are borders for? It is a question that has recently gone mainstream. Debate about ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ borders finds a parallel in attempts to determine whether Roman borders blocked or simply regulated movement. In this regard, the true nature of Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall remains a mystery. As the modern world is reminding us, though, the nature […]

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Down by the riverside: exploring Iron Age rituals in the Fens

For more than 20 years, Cambridge Archaeological Unit has been excavating fields lining either side of the Great Ouse, at Barleycroft Farm and Over, in the Cambridgeshire Fens. This cluster of ancient mid-river islands and ridges turns out to house surprising secrets: they seem to have been the focus of some intriguing Iron Age mortuary […]

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Current Archaeology 325

This month CA turns 50 and we are taking the opportunity to celebrate. Alongside the usual array of fascinating archaeological discoveries, we have sprinkled a selection of offerings with an anniversary theme. Our special wraparound cover pays homage to the very first issue, giving a modern and CA 1-style treatment to the excavations at the […]

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Current Archaeology 321

Legend has it that the Rothwell charnel chapel was discovered when a grave digger tumbled into an underground vault stacked with bones. This alarming incident brought to light a rare example of an intact medieval ossuary in England. Our cover feature explores why the dead were assembled in this manner, and how common the practice was. […]

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Worlds apart?

The Romans in Ireland Ireland has no known Roman forts, villas or planned towns, but a recent project designed to investigate Ireland during the first five centuries AD found plenty of evidence for interaction between Ireland and the Roman world, as Chris Catling now reports. History in Ireland traditionally begins with the arrival of St […]

PRESS RELEASE: Canterbury Archaeological Trust wins prestigious award as Rescue Dig of the Year following a record number of votes from the general public

Top honours for  Rescue Dig of the Year  at the prestigious Current Archaeology Awards went to  Canterbury Archaeological Trust for their work at Folkestone Roman villa. First examined in 1924, coastal erosion prompted a re-examination of the site before it was lost forever. This revealed that the villa overlay a major Iron Age port of […]

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