The award for Rescue Project of the Year was accepted by the Cambridge Archaeological Unit and the University of Cambridge for their work at Must Farm.

Excavations of the burnt roundhouses at Must Farm have recovered quantities of well-preserved pottery, tools, textiles, and more, which paint a picture of daily life in Bronze Age Britain in greater detail than ever before.

Accepting the award, Mark Knight of the Cambridge Archaeological Unit said:

“This site was the product of good archaeology, of a great group working together. It is a project that was started long ago, we must remember Francis Pryor’s work at Flag Fen. It shows what we can learn if we immerse ourselves in a landscape.”

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Below are all the nominees in this category:


The Must Farm inferno: exploring an intact Late Bronze Age settlement

(CA 312 and 319 – Cambridge Archaeological Unit / University of Cambridge)

Excavations of the burnt roundhouses at Must Farm have recovered quantities of well-preserved pottery, tools, textiles, and more, which paint a picture of daily life in Bronze Age Britain in greater detail than ever before.

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Fast track to the past: celebrating Crossrail’s archaeology

(CA 313 – Crossrail)

 A major infrastructure project created one of the largest  archaeological programmes ever undertaken, revealing a wealth of secrets hidden beneath modern London. Work on over 40 construction sites unearthed more than 10,000 finds.

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Wales in the vanguard: pioneering protection of the past

(CA 314 – Welsh Archaeological Trusts)

Wales’ trailblazing archaeological trusts have been doing vital work to protect the country’s heritage for 40 years. The Welsh Assembly too is leading the way, putting forward arguably the most progressive heritage legislation in the UK.

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Letters from Londinium: reading the earliest writing from Roman Britain

(CA 317 – MOLA)

Among the remarkable artefacts recovered from the site of  the new Bloomberg headquarters were 405 writing tablets. Of these, 87 have now been deciphered, allowing a glimpse at the lives and legal wranglings of Britain’s earliest authors.

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Buried between road and river: investigating a Roman cemetery in Leicester

(CA 319 – University of Leicester Archaeological Services)

 An investigation at a Roman cemetery in Leicester has made some surprising discoveries and has provided the first evidence of the town’s migrant population.

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Because I’m worth it: Apethorpe preserved

(CA 320 – Historic England)

In 2004, the government used a compulsory purchase order to take Apethorpe into state care. Some 20 years of work and millions of pounds have been spent rescuing the stately home from decline.

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