We are delighted to announce that
Mark Knight is the winner of this year’s prestigious Archaeologist of the Year award.

Mark Knight, the Archaeologist of the Year for 2017.

Directing the Must Farm excavations for the Cambridge Archaeological Unit, Knight specialises in prehistoric landscapes, as well as Neolithic and Bronze Age pottery. His interests include exploring later prehistoric contexts of inhabitation and mobility, and comprehending the lives of people in southern Britain between 3800-800 BC.

Mark’s first experience of archaeology was six years working with the Exeter Museum’s Archaeological Field Unit as a result of the Manpower Services Commission. Encouraged by the unit’s then director, he left to study archaeology. After completing his degree in 1995, Mark joined the CAU and began researching the prehistoric Fens, a landscape that still absorbs him some 20 years on.

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Accepting the award, Mark Knight said:

“The Must Farm project was a team effort – the product of great teamwork, a great group of people. And if I am any good at what I do, it is because of working for Cambridge Archaeological Unit, and being able to immerse myself in the world of rescue archaeology and research, and to immerse myself in the Fenland landscape.”

Below are all the nominees in this category:


 Richard Bradley

richard-bradleyRichard Bradley is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at the University of Reading, where he was appointed assistant lecturer in 1971 on the strength of his publications, without having any formal academic qualifications in the subject.

His fieldwork over the years has focused on prehistoric settlements, landscapes, and monuments in England, Scotland, Spain, and Scandinavia. Having written books on ancient art and on ritual and domestic life, Richard recently published a new account, coauthored with three colleagues, of the prehistory of Northwest Europe, drawing on the results of development-led archaeology. He is currently preparing a revised edition of his 2007 book The Prehistory of Britain and Ireland.


Mark Knight

mark-knight-caMark Knight directed the Must Farm excavations for the Cambridge Archaeological Unit. He specialises in prehistoric landscapes, as well as Neolithic and Bronze Age pottery. His interests include exploring later prehistoric contexts of inhabitation and mobility, and comprehending the lives of people in southern Britain between 3800-800 BC.

Mark’s first experience of archaeology was six years working with the Exeter Museum’s Archaeological Field Unit as a result of the Manpower Services Commission. Encouraged by the unit’s then director, he left to study archaeology. After completing his degree in 1995, Mark joined the CAU and began researching the prehistoric Fens, a landscape that still absorbs him some 20 years on.

 


Taryn Nixon

taryn-nixonTaryn Nixon has run MOLA for 19 years as Managing Director and Chief Executive. She joined in 1987 as an archaeologist, later becoming Project Manager and Head of Operations. She has led MOLA through major changes, seeing it become an accredited Independent Research Organisation and one of Europe’s largest and best-regarded heritage practices.

Taryn is passionate about the power of archaeology to strengthen communities. An active contributor to standards and policy, she was instrumental in setting up the PARIS conference series (an invaluable research source on preservation in situ), and initiated and chaired the Southport Report on realising public benefit from development-led archaeology. She recently stepped down as Chief Executive to focus on her research.

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