Winner of the Archaeological Innovation of the Last 50 Years was LiDAR, as exemplified by the New Forest National Park Authority.

Lawrence Shaw accepts the award.

The award recognized the successful use of laser mapping surveys to reveal thousands of previously unknown archaeological sites, from prehistoric field systems and Bronze Age burial mounds to an undocumented Iron Age hillfort.

Lawrence Shaw of the New Forest National Park Authority said: “It’s an honour to represent a fantastic advance in technology. LiDAR is a technique that is revolutionising how we see landscapes.”

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Official Award Sponsor

Read more about all the nominees below.


3D modelling

As exemplified by Scottish Ten  (CA 271 and 289)

In 2009, Scottish Ten set out to digitally document Scotland’s then five World Heritage Sites and five international sites, creating accurate 3D models to help with their conservation, interpretation, and virtual access.


Bayesian modelling

As exemplified by Gathering Time  (CA 259)

New radiocarbon techniques have resulted in a more precise chronology for causewayed enclosures in southern Britain and Ireland than was ever thought possible.


Dendrochronology

As exemplified by Queen’s University Belfast dendrochronology laboratory   (CA 73)

Mike Baillie has devoted his career to establishing the tree ring chronology from Irish bog oaks, on which, in practice, all tree ring chronology in Britain depends.


Digital data

As exemplified by the Archaeology Data Service  (CA 155)

Set up in 1996, the Archaeology Data Service is a digital archive, supporting research and learning with now over a million records freely available.


DNA

As exemplified by the Grey Friars Project  (CA 277)

Geneticists and archaeologists at the University of Leicester used mitochondrial DNA to link Richard III’s maternal line to a skeleton found on the Grey Friars site, leading to a positive identification of the ‘king in the car park’.


Geophysics

As exemplified by the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project  (CA 296)

An ambitious programme of geophysical survey, covering over 13 square kilometres around Stonehenge, has revealed a landscape scattered with previously unknown features.


Isotope analysis

As exemplified by the Beaker People Project  (CA 265)

Analysis of 285 burials for strontium, oxygen, sulphur, carbon, and nitrogen isotopes helped paint a picture of Beaker period migration and diet in Britain in 2500-1700 BC.


LiDAR

As exemplified by the New Forest National Park Authority  (CA 285)

Laser mapping surveys have revealed thousands of previously unknown archaeological sites, from prehistoric field systems and Bronze Age burial mounds to an undocumented Iron Age hillfort.


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