Issues

Current Archaeology 305 - now on sale!

Current Archaeology 305

Chedworth Roman Villa is undergoing a major transformation. Despite being one of England’s largest and best-preserved Roman villas, it was poorly understood. Past site reports had been lost, and previously excavated portions had been reburied. The National Trust has therefore launched a major project to re-explore the site. The results, as our cover picture reveals, […]

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Current Archaeology 304

Eight hundred years ago, a band of revolting barons famously forced Bad King John to seal Magna Carta at Runnymede. But while historians have pored over the documents, what about the archaeology? Why Runnymede, and what remains on the ground? Architectural historian and archaeologist Tim Tatton-Brown enlightens us. Tim then takes us to two must-see […]

CA 303 - out now!

Current Archaeology 303

What was life like in Londinium when the first Romans arrived? In the shadows of St Paul’s Cathedral, at the site of 10 Gresham Street, archaeologists have revealed London’s largest-known cluster of indigenous round-houses. They date from the Roman city’s very earliest years. Read our feature to discover how this dynamic site is shedding new […]

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Current Archaeology 302

In 1929, a bright young scholar named Eric Birley arrived at Vindolanda, the Roman fort and settlement lying just south of Hadrian’s Wall. Eric was to embark on an archaeological journey that forms an important part of British history, and is a voyage of discovery pursued by his family to this day. From his son’s […]

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Current Archaeology 301

The religious reforms of Henry VIII changed not only English ecclesiastical life, they also tore into the social fabric of England. The Catholic Church had been the cornerstone of society, and children in particular had benefited from its monastic institutions through alms, sanctuary, and education. But how were children affected by the Reformation’s Dissolution of […]

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Current Archaeology 300

When I launched Current Archaeology in 1967 I never thought that  we would ever reach issue 300. To my surprise, 12,000 pages and  more than 1,000 articles later, issue 300 is now upon us, and so  we have taken the opportunity to look back at the archaeology of  these past 48 years, and to think […]

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Current Archaeology 299

What is the lost island of Drumclay, as featured on this month’s cover? Established in the 8th century, on the shore of Knockalough in Northern Ireland, it was in use for a millennium. But this is no ordinary island: it is a crannog — an artificial island — that was built on top of a […]

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Current Archaeology 298

What do we really know about the Vikings? Yes, they raided, and they hoarded (as illustrated by our richly tangled cover shot). But what cultural footprint did they leave in Scotland, England, Wales, and Ireland, and how does their archaeological legacy differ from place to place? Carly Hilts explores a wealth of data on the […]

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Current Archaeology 297

All that glitters is not gold? According to the latest research  on the Staffordshire Hoard, it certainly seems so. Ongoing  investigations are revealing that sophisticated Saxon goldsmiths  had developed a technique to make their gold appear to be  rather more golden than it really was. But how did they do it?  Carly Hilts spoke with […]

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Current Archaeology 296

What lies beneath the ground at Stonehenge? A major initiative to map the geophysics of some 12 square kilometres of surrounding landscape is now all but complete. This has revealed a startling amount of archaeology, including the footprints of hundreds of previously unknown features that range from henge-like monuments to ditches and pits. Turn to […]

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