Author: Kathryn Krakowka

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Roman hoard holds unique dog statue

A Roman hoard dating to c.AD 318-450 and holding several hundred bronze objects has been found in Gloucestershire. Discovered by metal-detectorists in September, its contents included pieces of a large bronze statue, jewellery fragments, and a coin of ‘Crispus globe on altar’ type, dated to AD 321-324 and minted in Trier, Germany. It is thought that […]

We die like brothers

Review – We Die Like Brothers: The Sinking of the SS Mendi

John Gribble and Graham Scott Historic England, £17.99 ISBN 978-1848023697 Review Antony Firth Most seagoing voyages are lost to time, leaving hardly a trace on the ever-moving oceans. Even the documentary records of a successful voyage will barely raise a ripple among the archives. This would also have been true of the steamship Mendi – […]

The place name kingston

Review – The Place-name Kingston and Royal Power in Middle Anglo-Saxon England

Jill Bourne BAR Publishing, £44.00 ISBN 978-140731568 Review Duncan W Wright In 925, Æthelstan – often styled as first ruler of all England – was consecrated in a ceremony where, for the first time, the king wore a crown rather than a helmet. The unprecedented service took place at a site recorded as Cinges tun(e), […]

Ancient oaks

Review – Ancient Oaks in the English Landscape

Aljos Farjon Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, £30.00 ISBN 978-1842466407 Review Spencer Gavin Smith This is a big book in more ways than one: a thick tome, at 400 pages, and one that addresses what is synonymous with England and the English way of life – Quercus robur, the English oak tree. Drawing together information from […]

Iron Age Roman and Anglo-Saxon cover

Review – Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon Settlement along the Empingham to Hannington Pipeline in Northamptonshire and Rutland

S Carlyle, J Clarke, and A Chapman Archaeopress, £26.00 ISBN 978-1784915346 Review Edward Biddulph A mixed blessing for archaeologists, pipelines slice through the countryside, offering the chance to investigate and compare the use through time of different landscapes, but, constrained by the width of the pipeline trench, the slice is invariably too narrow to gain […]

Viking Britain

Review – Viking Britain: an exploration

Thomas Williams William Collins, £25 ISBN 978-0008171933 Review CH The image of Vikings as marauding barbarians is one that we have all encountered in popular culture. Indeed, even Thomas Williams, author of this absorbing new account of their interactions with Britain (and the British Museum’s Curator of Early Medieval Coins, who spearheaded their blockbuster exhibition […]

Funerary scene

Review – Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia

Who were the Scythians? They left behind no written records, but archaeology lets us get up close and personal with these nomadic warriors. Lucia Marchini finds out more at the British Museum’s latest exhibition. From the end of the 17th century, the glittering possessions of nomadic warriors began to be discovered in the Urals and […]

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Roman sarcophagus found in Southwark

Archaeologists working in Southwark have uncovered a late Roman sarcophagus, the contents of which are soon to be examined at the Museum of London’s archive.  The excavation was carried out at Harper Road by Pre-Construct Archaeology (working on behalf of the archaeological consultancy CGMS, for Galliard Homes), in an area known as the Southern Cemetery. Lying […]

gospels (2)

Using parchment to reveal the ancient lives of livestock

Innovative methods of utilising ancient protein and DNA analysis have revealed new information about medieval parchment and the animals from which they are made. A group of researchers from Trinity College Dublin and the University of York have taken eraser rubbings – left over from the cleaning of medieval manuscripts – and extracted DNA and […]