Author: Kathryn Krakowka

Must-Farm-Excavation

Science Notes – Parasites and poo at Must Farm

In this month’s ‘Science Notes’, we dive into the world of palaeoparasitology, and examine what the study of faecal matter can tell us about human health and behaviour in the past. While we may not like to acknowledge it, humans play host to a large number of parasites. Which parasites affect us and how they influence our health, however, can vary wildly based on our diet, living conditions, and other environmental factors.

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Buried secrets revealed at Dinas Dinlle coastal fort

August saw the first ever archaeological excavation to be carried out at the iconic north Wales prehistoric coastal fort of Dinas Dinlle, owned by the National Trust. The hillfort, which is mentioned in the Welsh legends of the Mabinogi, is being dramatically cut by coastal erosion. Between 20m and 40m of the western side has […]

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Mesolithic maritime discovery at Bouldnor Cliff

A rare wooden platform has been found at Bouldnor Cliff – a Mesolithic site that lies 11m underwater in the Solent, just east of the Isle of Wight. With around 60 pieces making up the structure, this discovery – along with other pieces of timber from the site – more than doubles the amount of worked wood recovered from this period in Britain.

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Science Notes – Debating Durrington Walls

In recent years, a flurry of archaeological work in the Stonehenge landscape has uncovered a wealth of spectacular new details about this area’s prehistoric use. Above all, these findings clearly show that our knowledge of the past is constantly evolving. When it comes to archaeological analysis, there are very few certainties, and re-examining earlier evidence in light of either new finds or the development of new technologies is essential to get nearer to the truth.

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New finds from the Pembrokeshire chariot burial

Recent excavations in an anonymous field in Pembrokeshire have yielded further finds from the late Iron Age chariot burial discovered there last year – the first of its kind to be identified in Wales.

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Review – The Archaeology of Roman York

On this whistle-stop tour of Roman York, Adam Parker gives us a tale of two cities. One is the military fortress, which was established in AD 70 or 71 and would shape the growth of the city long after the Romans left. Then there was the colonia, the civilian settlement that developed on the other side of the river. Over time, it acquired all the necessities of a grand city: public baths, townhouses decorated with mosaics, temples, monumental tombs that lined the roads into the city, and, possibly, an amphitheatre.

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Review – Raasay: the ACFA archaeological surveys 1995-2009

The Isle of Raasay is in sharp focus in Scottish culture. It is the place whose cleared settlements informed Sorley MacLean’s important Gaelic poem Hallaig. It is the landscape where Calum MacLeod spent ten years in the 1960s and 1970s hand-building a road to keep his community connected.

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