Author: Kathryn Krakowka

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Rethinking Scottish crannogs

New excavation and analysis of three crannogs – or man-made islands – in the Outer Hebrides has clearly demonstrated that they had Neolithic origins, changing our understanding of these enigmatic sites.

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Ordnance from the Battle of Glenshiel revealed

Remnants from the Battle of Glensheil – the Highland battle that ended the 1719 Jacobite Rising and James Francis Edward Stuart’s ambitions of sitting on the throne from which his father, James II and VII, had been deposed – were recently discovered during an excavation marking the 300th anniversary of the battle.

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A handy discovery in Northamptonshire

During excavations at Warth Park in Raunds, Northamptonshire, archaeologists from Oxford Archaeology east made an unusual roman discovery: a wooden arm with an open right hand.

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Science Notes – Calculating historical population fluctuations in Ireland

Previously, large-scale changes in population were quite difficult, if not impossible, to discern from the archaeological record. But while there are still many biases and pitfalls, new statistical techniques are starting to provide innovative ways to determine movement and migration patterns. In this month’s ‘Science Notes’, we explore some of these new techniques, and examine recent research that has utilised them to assess population fluctuations in Ireland.

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Current Archaeology 354 – now on sale

On 6 June, we marked the 75th anniversary of D-Day. Among the Allied troops involved in that watershed campaign was the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne, US Army. They were nicknamed ‘Easy Company’, but – thanks in part to a 2001 TV series – today they are better known as the ‘Band of Brothers’. […]

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Review – Hadrian’s Wall: history and guide

Anyone visiting Hadrian’s Wall is well advised to take a guidebook. There are many available, but one of the most useful is Guy de la Bédoyère’s handy volume. Though a slim book, it is packed full of detail.

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Review – The Clayton Collection

The importance of the Clayton Collection extends significantly beyond its home ground of Chesters (Cilurnum), though the focus of the present volume is on the material from Cilurnum. That is set in the context of Clayton’s ownership of, and interest in, the site; his position in the tradition of 19th-century antiquarianism; the formation of the Collection; and its subsequent development.

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