Author: Carly Hilts

Citadel-of-the-Saxons

Review – Citadel of the Saxons: the rise of early London

Written with an evocative turn of phrase and a sharp eye for interesting detail, Citadel of the Saxons is packed full of information, and impressive in its scope given that it is under 200 pages long. Rory begins his account in the 5th century amidst the ruins of Roman London, before tracing the settlement’s rebirth and rise to new heights of prosperity, ending with the Norman Conquest of 1066.

Roman-writing

Roman writing on the wall

In the depths of a Cumbrian wood, intrepid archaeologists have been abseiling down the wall of a Roman quarry to document eroding inscriptions left by 3rd-century soldiers tasked with harvesting the sandstone to help repair Hadrian’s Wall.

Star-Carr

Life beside the lake

Over a decade of research at Britain’s most important Mesolithic site has shed vivid light on life shortly after the end of the last Ice Age. With the project’s findings now published in a wide-ranging two-volume monograph, Carly Hilts explores some of the most illuminating discoveries.

Black-Rock-Final

Meeting Brighton’s ancestors

For the past two decades, Brighton Museum & Art Gallery has had no dedicated space exploring the area’s archaeology. Now, though, thanks to a long-running campaign and a gift from a local benefactor, a stunning new gallery has just been opened. Carly Hilts went along to find out more.

Trumpington

Life among the dead

A small area of rural Cambridgeshire has proven remarkably rich in archaeological evidence for the funerary practices of long-vanished communities – including unusual burials from the Neolithic, Bronze Age, and Iron Age.

Calder-stones

Conserving the Calder stones

The small stone circle that has stood in Liverpool’s Calderstones Park for the past half century is in fact the remains of a chambered tomb. Now its uprights have been carefully removed and taken to London for conservation before they return home to be arranged in a new installation more in keeping with their original form.

Sacred-Britannia

Review – Sacred Britannia: the gods and rituals of Roman Britain

What did the Romans do for us? Aside from sanitation, roads, and many other technological and engineering innovations that were introduced to these shores during imperial occupation, their arrival also transformed Britain’s religious landscape. With the Roman army came not only knowledge of the Classical pantheon, but also more exotic mystery cults and gods from the eastern fringes of the empire – including Christianity.

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