Author: Carly Hilts

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Earliest written reference to London found

The earliest-known written reference to London was revealed today (1 June) by MOLA archaeologists, as part of Britain’s largest, earliest, and most significant group of Roman waxed writing tablets. The reference forms part of an address – Londinio Mogontio, ‘To Mogontius [a Celtic personal name], in London’, and appears on a writing tablet dating from c.AD […]

Bulford skeleton

Prehistoric monuments and 150 Anglo-Saxon graves found at Bulford

Excavations on MOD land in Bulford, Wiltshire, have uncovered 150 Anglo-Saxon graves spanning the later 7th to early 8th century, and a host of prehistoric finds – as well as new insights into early medieval burial practices. Containing the remains of men, women, and children, the burials were arranged in neat rows, packed closely together […]

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A model monarch: Richard III’s grave recreated in 3D

One year after Richard III’s reinterment, the University of Leicester has released a 3D interactive representation of the king’s grave and skeleton. Created by University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS), who excavated the Greyfriars site where Richard III had been laid to rest, the fully rotatable computer model shows the king’s remains in situ as they were […]

Current Archaeology 313 - out-now!

Current Archaeology 313

Mention Iron Age settlement, and most people’s minds turn to hillforts, oppida, or even the evocatively named banjo enclosures. One thing all of these sites have in common is earthworks that encircle or at least sketch out the bounds of occupation. ‘Duropolis’ is different. Excavations at Winterborne Kingston are revealing a dense cluster of roundhouses […]

Mersea cremation

The fragrant dead: How to treat your dead, the Roman way

Within Roman society, highly aromatic resins were important in ritual activity, and sometimes even applied directly to the body at death. But did this sacred rite ever reach the remote province of Britannia? Bradford University’s Rhea Brettell and Carl Heron launched a project to discover more. To the Romans, frankincense, myrrh, and other fragrant resins […]

CA-307---out-now!

Current Archaeology 307

We are used to seeing the Celts through the filter of Greek and Roman propaganda. Ancient writers poke fun at the luxuriant moustaches sported by Celtic warriors, and cast them as the barbaric foils to Classical civilisation. Celtic art, though, tells a different story. Hidden among its graceful curves and elegant motifs are elusive abstract […]

Volunteers investigating Thornliebank house and tea room at Rouken Glen Park, East Renfrewshire

Scottish Archaeology and Heritage Festival

September is a momentous month for Scottish archaeology. It opens with delegates gathering for the prestigious European Association of Archaeologists conference in Glasgow, and then launches into the inaugural Scottish Archaeology and Heritage Festival. Lesley McEwan guides us through some of the events on offer. It is with great excitement that we will launch the […]

Holt1

Holt Castle restored to royal glory

Holt Castle in Denbighshire, northeast Wales, was built under Edward I and later served as Richard II’s treasury but today its royal connections are far from obvious. Plundered for stone to build the 17th century Eaton Hall in Cheshire, the once-mighty fortification has been reduced to overgrown ruins. Now, however, a Castle Studies Trust-funded project […]

Current Archaeology 305 - now on sale!

Current Archaeology 305

Chedworth Roman Villa is undergoing a major transformation. Despite being one of England’s largest and best-preserved Roman villas, it was poorly understood. Past site reports had been lost, and previously excavated portions had been reburied. The National Trust has therefore launched a major project to re-explore the site. The results, as our cover picture reveals, […]

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