Author: Carly Hilts

Carly studied Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic at St John's College, Cambridge, before becoming a journalist. Quickly realising she preferred covering history and archaeology stories above all others, she joined Time Team as a researcher, later working for Horrible Histories and helping create an ancient Egyptian-themed computer game. At CA she is responsible for news and book reviews and is always delighted to receive suggestions for either section. Connect with me on Google+
Excavations-at-Oxford-Castle

Review – Excavations at Oxford Castle, 1999-2009

Built in 1071, Oxford Castle was an imposing fortification with one of the largest mottes in the country. Largely abandoned by the late 16th century – though it was briefly refortified in the Civil War – the castle ultimately evolved into a prison that operated until 1996. When this institution closed, redevelopment of the site gave Oxford Archaeology the opportunity to carry out a decade of investigations between 1999 and 2009 – uncovering finds spanning the 11th century to the present day.

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Review – The Prittlewell princely burial: excavations at Priory Crescent, 2003

In 2003, an excavation by MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) discovered a spectacular Anglo-Saxon burial chamber at Prittlewell, near Southend-on-Sea. Since then, expert analysis of the burial and its contents has indeed yielded a vast array of new information – the result of which is this absorbing monograph, which is packed with insights from the scientific studies that have been undertaken on the finds.

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The Chew Valley hoard

The most-famous date in English history is said to be 1066 – but what was the immediate impact of the Norman Conquest? We explore a recently discovered coin hoard, the largest of its kind, buried in Somerset c.1068. What can it tell us about the first years after the Battle of Hastings?

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What’s new at Sutton Hoo?

This summer marks 80 years since the Sutton Hoo ship burial was discovered, revolutionising our understanding of the Anglo-Saxon period. The site has just reopened to the public following a £4 million investment. Carly Hilts paid a visit to see how a celebrated story had been presented anew.

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The Great Dunham torc

What can the first Bronze Age gold torc to be found in Norfolk for 25 years tell us about the influence of the region’s population 3,000 years ago?

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Review – Citadel of the Saxons: the rise of early London

Written with an evocative turn of phrase and a sharp eye for interesting detail, Citadel of the Saxons is packed full of information, and impressive in its scope given that it is under 200 pages long. Rory begins his account in the 5th century amidst the ruins of Roman London, before tracing the settlement’s rebirth and rise to new heights of prosperity, ending with the Norman Conquest of 1066.

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Meeting Brighton’s ancestors

For the past two decades, Brighton Museum & Art Gallery has had no dedicated space exploring the area’s archaeology. Now, though, thanks to a long-running campaign and a gift from a local benefactor, a stunning new gallery has just been opened. Carly Hilts went along to find out more.

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