Author: Amy Brunskill

London's-lost-rivers

Review – London’s Lost Rivers: a walker’s guide – volume two

In this second volume of London’s Lost Rivers, Tom Bolton presents the history of the city along nine of its more obscure rivers. Through the suggested walks along the routes of rivers such as Bollo Brook, Counters Creek, and Black Ditch, which once ran through the city but are now lost or buried underground, readers are able to follow the development of the landscape over time.

Megalithic-Europe

Review – Exploring Megalithic Europe

In this new publication, Julian Heath presents a guide to the impressive stone structures created in the Neolithic, Chalcolithic, and Bronze Age, which dominate landscapes in many parts of Europe, bringing to life the world of the prehistoric people who once inhabited them.

Aerial-view-of-MOLA-excavating-Principal-Place

Science Notes – Bridging the gap in London’s prehistory

Over recent decades, developments in radiocarbon dating techniques have revolutionised our ability to establish the age of archaeological material and to interpret the past (see CA 359). In this month’s Science Notes we will be exploring how, thanks to further advances in this field, ‘the most significant group of Early Neolithic pottery ever uncovered in London’ has shed intriguing light on the capital’s prehistoric past.

Tewkesbury-bridge

Reconstructing a moated site near Tewkesbury

Archaeological investigations at a moated site near Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, have shed light on the original extent of the medieval enclosure, as well as uncovering material spanning the 12th century almost to the present day.

Sylt-overhead

Alderney’s concentration camp uncovered

An archaeological project on Alderney has uncovered information about the labour and concentration camp of Sylt that once stood on the island, shedding light on the lives of prisoners during the Nazi occupation of the Channel Islands in the Second World War.

Colle-Gnifetti-Drilling-and-logging-NS

12th-century lead pollution visible in Alpine ice

Lead pollution produced by 12th-century mines in Britain can be seen in Alpine ice cores, new research reports – directly mirroring historical records and demonstrating the impact of political events of the time.

Stonehenge_wikimedia_Sumit-Surai

Heritage from home

With museums currently closed and events cancelled or postponed, you might be missing your regular dose of archaeology and heritage activities (other than reading CA, of course!). But there is still an abundance of places you can ‘visit’, events you can take part in, and learning and entertainment opportunities of all sorts available online. We explore a selection of resources and activities to help you get involved from home.

The-bottles-stacked-beneath-the-stairs

Urban insights at Leeds’ Tetley’s Brewery

Excavations on the site of Tetley’s Brewery in Leeds have revealed intriguing insights into the 18th- and 19th-century development of the city. Carried out by Archaeological Services WYAS, the investigation explored buildings along Hunslet Lane, including the location of the Scarborough Castle Inn, adjacent shops, and a side street known as South Terrace.

Looking-East-across-the-site-to-the-North-Sea

DNA analysis sheds light on whalebone use in Iron Age Orkney

Recent DNA analysis of whalebone artefacts found at The Cairns, Orkney, has shed light on the relationship between these marine mammals and the site’s Iron Age community, as well as hinting why the large local broch may have been demolished in the 2nd century AD.

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