Books

Brick

Review – Brick: a social history

In England we are so surrounded by brick, much of our cities and towns being built out if it, that we are in danger of taking it entirely for granted. Carolyne Haynes’ delightful paperback book sets out to change this. She introduces the reader to the joys and intricacies of English brickwork, and most particularly to some of the stories behind those who made it.

Mudlarking

Review – Mudlarking: lost and found on the River Thames

The tidal reach of the River Thames is the longest archaeological site in Britain, its rhythmically rising and falling waters exposing a wealth of material spanning millennia of human activity along its banks. For the last decade, thousands of features and objects have been recorded by the Thames Discovery Programme and its volunteers – but people have also been exploring the foreshore and its finds on a more informal basis for centuries.

Slate-Industry_Anthony-Coulls-2

Review – The Slate Industry

Your reviewer has to admit that he may lack entire objectivity when it comes to this book as he is thanked in the acknowledgements and he also commented on the draft in typescript. The author has prepared a concise, informed, well-researched and very readable introduction to a subject that has never previously been written up, the slate industry of Britain as a whole. The illustrations are well-chosen, and the text is clear and enjoyable, though a map might have helped.

Yorkshire

Review – Yorkshire: a story of invasion, uprising and conflict

In this book, the history of Yorkshire from prehistory to present day is told through the lens of the conflicts that occurred in each period. Beginning with prehistoric occupation and following the story of the region up to the 20th century, the bulk of the work focuses on the medieval conquests and battles, and the effects that they had on the area and its population.

Roman-Gardens

Review – Roman Gardens

This slim book offers an interesting introduction to Roman gardens, the mythology and history behind them, and the details of their design. Author Anthony Beeson (an expert in Roman iconography – see p.18 of this issue) states that gardens were part of ‘Romanitas’, the set of cultural and political beliefs and practices by which Romans defined themselves, and this point is made clearly and convincingly throughout the book.

Time_Please_pubs

Review – Time, Please: lost inns, pubs and alehouses of the Yorkshire Dales

The rather modest avowed aim of this book is to ‘present a series of snapshots of drinking establishments through the ages’, and author David Johnson has succeeded in this. As the title indicates, his book covers premises that have either been demolished or converted to other uses, rather than those, far fewer in number, which continue to trade. The book focuses, as Johnson makes clear, particularly on the Craven district, and is nicely illustrated with many old and contemporary photographs, together with clear maps showing the inns of Settle and Skipton.

Hadrian's-Wall-2009-2019

Review – Hadrian’s Wall 2009-2019: A summary of recent excavation and research prepared for the Fourteenth Pilgrimage of Hadrian’s Wall, 2019

This extremely important volume was produced to accompany the 14th Pilgrimage of Hadrian’s Wall, an event that was explored in CA 353. It stands in line with earlier volumes produced for previous Pilgrimages in 2009 and 1999. Rob Collins and Matthew Symonds were selected by the Committee that managed the 14th Pilgrimage to compile and edit this impressive volume, which forms a handy summary of the research that has been undertaken on Hadrian’s Wall during the past decade.

50-Finds-from-Berkshire

Review – 50 Finds from Berkshire: objects from the Portable Antiquities Scheme

The latest publication in the 50 Finds from the Portable Antiquities Scheme series uses a wide range of artefacts, carefully selected from the 10,000 objects recorded through the PAS in Berkshire, to tell the story of life in this landscape. The book’s chronological structure and effective use of illustrations brings to life the history of the area from the Lower Palaeolithic to the late 1700s.

< 1 2 3 4 5 >»