Category: News

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Earliest written reference to London found

The earliest-known written reference to London was revealed today (1 June) by MOLA archaeologists, as part of Britain’s largest, earliest, and most significant group of Roman waxed writing tablets. The reference forms part of an address – Londinio Mogontio, ‘To Mogontius [a Celtic personal name], in London’, and appears on a writing tablet dating from c.AD […]

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Prehistoric monuments and 150 Anglo-Saxon graves found at Bulford

Excavations on MOD land in Bulford, Wiltshire, have uncovered 150 Anglo-Saxon graves spanning the later 7th to early 8th century, and a host of prehistoric finds – as well as new insights into early medieval burial practices. Containing the remains of men, women, and children, the burials were arranged in neat rows, packed closely together […]

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A model monarch: Richard III’s grave recreated in 3D

One year after Richard III’s reinterment, the University of Leicester has released a 3D interactive representation of the king’s grave and skeleton. Created by University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS), who excavated the Greyfriars site where Richard III had been laid to rest, the fully rotatable computer model shows the king’s remains in situ as they were […]

Volunteers investigating Thornliebank house and tea room at Rouken Glen Park, East Renfrewshire

Scottish Archaeology and Heritage Festival

September is a momentous month for Scottish archaeology. It opens with delegates gathering for the prestigious European Association of Archaeologists conference in Glasgow, and then launches into the inaugural Scottish Archaeology and Heritage Festival. Lesley McEwan guides us through some of the events on offer. It is with great excitement that we will launch the […]

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Holt Castle restored to royal glory

Holt Castle in Denbighshire, northeast Wales, was built under Edward I and later served as Richard II’s treasury but today its royal connections are far from obvious. Plundered for stone to build the 17th century Eaton Hall in Cheshire, the once-mighty fortification has been reduced to overgrown ruins. Now, however, a Castle Studies Trust-funded project […]

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Revealed: the Brightlingsea Harpy

Fans of Classical mythology (or the Game of Thrones series!) may be interested in the latest news from Colchester, where a  conservator has  just completed the painstaking process of cleaning a newly-discovered copper-alloy  harpy. Standing 98mm tall, with an intricately detailed face (topped with braided hair), wings, talons, and scales, the Roman figurine  is the […]

Lucy with beer & the tombstone

Bodicacia’s brew: raising a toast to a recent Roman find

The recent discovery of a rare Roman tombstone by Cotswold Archaeology in Cirencester (CA 302) is being celebrated by the launch of a new beer named in honour of the woman it commemorates. ‘Bodicacia’ – a 4.7% golden ale that contains a variety of English hops including the floral ‘Boadicea’ – has been brewed by […]

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April Fool!

April Fool! Did we catch you out with our ‘breaking news’ about the earliest-known representation of the Easter Bunny? Sadly this discovery only exists in our imaginations – but the artefact we featured is real, though in reality it  is a 2nd-3rd century Roman brooch  from Lincolnshire. You can read its entry on the Portable […]

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