Category: Features

Conservation in the community

American-born conservator Dana Goodburn-Brown has worked around the world and made numerous appearances on television. Now, her infectious enthusiasm is inspiring a band of volunteers based in the unlikely location of a Kent shopping centre. CA‘s Caitlin McCall went to meet her. What does a conservator do? A conservator is responsible for the care, preservation […]

Liquid History: Excavating London’s great river, The Thames

Prehistoric forests, the skull of a child, the slipway of a Victorian engineering masterpiece and part of a Tudor palace jetty: all have emerged from the mud and gravel on the foreshore of the Thames, thanks to an exciting new project to record the archaeology of London’s great river.   Nathalie Cohen tells CA about […]

Howburn Farm: Excavating Scotland’s first people

At Howburn Farm in South Lanarkshire, a scattering of flints, discovered by the Biggar Archaeology Group, turned out to be evidence of the earliest human habitation in Scotland. Tam Ward and Alan Saville explain. How far north did Palaeolithic people settle in Britain? The general belief is that they did not go much further than […]

Dark Satanic mills? The archaeology of the world’s first industrial city

By 1850, Manchester had a population of 300,000, and most of its 172 textile mills had already been built. Cotton goods were known simply as ‘Manchester goods’. Now, archaeology is adding new insights. We report on ten years’ digging of Manchester’s industrial history. In 1814, Johann Georg May wrote: ‘Manchester is famous throughout the world […]

Lanton Quarry: New evidence in northern Northumberland

A routine investigation ahead of gravel quarrying has turned up some exciting results: has the ‘support centre’ for the elite Anglo-Saxon settlement of Yeavering been found? Clive Waddington discusses the evidence. In the very north of Northumberland lies an old, dried-out glacial lake that is surrounded by raised gravel terraces, known as the Milfield Basin. […]

Magic and Mining at Alderley Edge

Listening to tales told by his blacksmith grandfather in the semi-darkness of his fire-lit forge, Alan Garner absorbed the Cheshire folklore that he then transformed into a classic work of fiction — The Weirdstone of Brisingamen. Inspired by Garner’s story, archaeologists have recently begun to unravel the truth behind the legends of Alderley Edge, as […]

Magic and Mining; the Alderly Edge Landscape Project

Listening to the tales told by his blacksmith grandfather in the semi-darkness of his fire-lit forge, Alan Garner absorbed the Cheshire folklore that transformed into a classic work of fiction – The Weirdstone of Brisingamen. Inspirred by Garner’s story archaeologists have recently begun to unravel the truth behind the legends of Alderly edge, as Chris […]

Archaeology Awards

  Last year in Cardiff, we launched the Current Archaeology Awards to resounding success. We’re excited to open this year’s competition and look forward to your votes  — just  CLICK HERE; these awards are our way of hearing back from all of you who have helped to make CA such a great success over the […]

Ice Age: archaeology and the climatic rollercoaster

We still live in the Ice Age that began around 2.5 million years ago. Our present time is an ‘interglacial’: a relatively warm period between two big freezes. Global warming looks set to change the pattern forever. In this major feature, we examine the new book by Brian Fagan and review the latest findings of […]

Bamburgh Castle: digging the home of Northumbria's kings

The Bamburgh Research Project is picking up the pieces of the archaeological work started by legendary eccentric Dr Brian Hope-Taylor, who had left virtually no record of his excavations — or so it was believed. The story of Bamburgh is two-fold: before properly investigating the site, the team must first excavate the archaeologist who worked […]