Features

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Review – Viking: rediscover the legend

An exhibition tracing the Vikings through the British Isles has reached the final stop on its two-year tour. Lucia Marchini headed to Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery to learn more about Norsemen in Norfolk and beyond.

Excavation of the Bitterley Hoard

Redefining ‘Treasure’: a public consultation and new guidance for landowners

The Heritage Minister has proposed a series of changes for the way Treasure finds are processed, and the PAS has released new metal-detecting guidance for landowners. With recorded Treasure finds hitting a record high for the second year running (CA 347), Heritage Minister Michael Ellis MP has launched a public consultation on a review of […]

Fan

Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from issues 201-300, part I

In my last two columns I picked some favourite covers from issues 101-200 (1986-2005) of Current Archaeology. I continue this series in the next two columns, focusing on CA 201-300 (2006-2015). Current Archaeology readers of this period and onwards benefited from the wider shift in publishing that had taken place in the early 2000s, when the cost of using colour in magazines dropped dramatically. The CAs of the 2000s are thus full-colour, 60-page editions that seem light years away from the magazine’s humble black-and-white, 20-page origins. But while much had changed in publishing and archaeology alike, the sites and stories range as widely as ever. Here are some of my personal favourites.

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Finding Captain Flinders at Euston

Archaeologists have identified the grave of the 19th-century explorer Matthew Flinders while excavating at Euston Station as part of the HS2 scheme.

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Roman ruins revealed under the Mercury Theatre

Recent excavations in Colchester, a town renowned for its rich Roman archaeology, have revealed more evidence from this period, spanning from the time of the AD 43 conquest of Britain into the 2nd century and beyond.

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That old chestnut: how sweet chestnuts came to Britain

It has long been thought that sweet chestnut trees were introduced to Britain by the Romans – a belief popularised by 18th-century writers – but new research assessing archaeobotanical samples from this period has now cast doubt on such assumptions.

Archaeologist-Samuel-Kinirons-with-the-find---credit-Scott-Louden,-The-Scotsman

Medieval projectile found a stone’s throw from Edinburgh Castle

A large carved stone that was probably launched from a medieval catapult or trebuchet has been excavated at Edinburgh’s Grassmarket. Similar in size and appearance to a cannonball, it was contextually dated to the 13th century – 200 years before the introduction of gunpower and cannons to Scotland. AOC Archaeology, who made the discovery, believes that it could have been used as a projectile, and its location suggests that the stone may have been propelled either from or towards the ramparts of Edinburgh Castle.

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Roman road unearthed in Lancashire

A section of the Roman road that runs between Wigan and Walton-le-Dale has recently been uncovered – a noteworthy discovery, as its precise location has been debated for more than a century. The route was identified by a team from Salford Archaeology (University of Salford), led by Oliver Cook, who were working on behalf of Lancashire County Council and Maple Grove Development Ltd ahead of major development in Cuerden, Lancashire.

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