Articles

Natural_History_Museum

Heritage from home – July

Although some heritage sites are slowly reopening, many of our favourite destinations will remain closed for a while longer. To fill the gap, Amy Brunskill has created another summary of some of the best ways to get involved in archaeology and heritage from home – as well as listing some of the places that you are now able to visit in person.

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Contact, conquest, and Cartimandua

Long-running improvement works on a section of the A1 have uncovered rare traces of how contact with the Roman Empire transformed a northern Iron Age settlement at a key routeway junction. Carly Hilts reports.

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Changing diets in Pictish Portmahomack

Isotopic analysis of skeletons excavated from a graveyard in the Scottish Highlands has revealed a story of changing diets among the Pictish and medieval communities at Portmahomack.

Invasive-Aliens

Review – Invasive Aliens

According to the most recent figures (from 2017), there are some 3,163 non-native species currently present in England, Wales, and Scotland, and 1,266 in Ireland, Dan Eatherley attests. The vast majority of these are plants – including many foods that we take for granted today, from apples to various forms of wheat – but they also include such familiar creatures as sparrows, donkeys, sheep and goats, house mice, and the domestic cat.

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Review – Digging into the Dark Ages

The use of the term ‘the Dark Ages’, to describe the early medieval period (5th-11th centuries AD) is closely tied to many of the misconceptions surrounding that era. This new publication, based on discussions at the 3rd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference in 2017, examines public understanding of early medieval archaeology, identifying and challenging ideas that persist in popular views of the period.

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Review – Houses of the Dead?

This volume, the 17th published by Oxbow on behalf of the Neolithic Studies Group, returns to two interrelated questions that have long been debated by archaeologists interested in Britain’s earliest monuments. The first is: do the wooden structures associated with long barrows represent ‘houses for the dead’?

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