Articles

Round-Mounds-site

Beautiful beads and a Bronze Age burial mound revealed at Berk Farm

A 4,000-year-old jet necklace comprising over 100 ornate beads has been discovered during the excavation of a Bronze Age burial mound on the Isle of Man. For the past three seasons, archaeologists have been excavating at Berk Farm, near Kirk Michael, as part of the Round Mounds of the Isle of Man project. This initiative […]

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What’s new at Sutton Hoo?

This summer marks 80 years since the Sutton Hoo ship burial was discovered, revolutionising our understanding of the Anglo-Saxon period. The site has just reopened to the public following a £4 million investment. Carly Hilts paid a visit to see how a celebrated story had been presented anew.

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Excavating the CA archive: Sutton Hoo revisited

Joe Flatman explores half a century of reports from the past. A selection of articles mentioned by Joe Flatman in this month’s column below can be accessed for free for one month via Exact Editions, from 5 September. Use the links within the text to jump to the individual articles, or click on the covers […]

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Norse hall discovered on Rousay

A large Viking-Age hall has been discovered during recent excavations at Skaill Farmstead on the island of Rousay, Orkney. Dating to the 10th-12th centuries AD, the outline of the structure was revealed by a team of archaeologists from the University of the Highlands and Islands’ Archaeology Institute, who have been digging at the site for a number of seasons.

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New finds from the Pembrokeshire chariot burial

Recent excavations in an anonymous field in Pembrokeshire have yielded further finds from the late Iron Age chariot burial discovered there last year – the first of its kind to be identified in Wales.

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The Great Dunham torc

What can the first Bronze Age gold torc to be found in Norfolk for 25 years tell us about the influence of the region’s population 3,000 years ago?

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Review – The Archaeology of Roman York

On this whistle-stop tour of Roman York, Adam Parker gives us a tale of two cities. One is the military fortress, which was established in AD 70 or 71 and would shape the growth of the city long after the Romans left. Then there was the colonia, the civilian settlement that developed on the other side of the river. Over time, it acquired all the necessities of a grand city: public baths, townhouses decorated with mosaics, temples, monumental tombs that lined the roads into the city, and, possibly, an amphitheatre.

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Review – Raasay: the ACFA archaeological surveys 1995-2009

The Isle of Raasay is in sharp focus in Scottish culture. It is the place whose cleared settlements informed Sorley MacLean’s important Gaelic poem Hallaig. It is the landscape where Calum MacLeod spent ten years in the 1960s and 1970s hand-building a road to keep his community connected.

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Review – Torre Abbey, Devon: the archaeology of the Premonstratensian abbey

Torbay will mean only one thing to most people: holidays! In Torre Abbey, however, the area holds a gem of monastic archaeology. The site was founded quite late, in 1196, by the Premonstratensians (reformed Augustinian canons). When it was closed in 1539, its value of almost £400 made it the wealthiest house of the monastic order in England. The site took a standard route after the Dissolution, with the cloister ranges converted into a fine residence for Sir Hugh Pollard.

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