Articles

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Review – Viking: rediscover the legend

An exhibition tracing the Vikings through the British Isles has reached the final stop on its two-year tour. Lucia Marchini headed to Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery to learn more about Norsemen in Norfolk and beyond.

Quarrying-in-Cumbria

Review – Quarrying in Cumbria

This small but fascinating book tells the story of quarrying, or ‘stone-getting’, in Cumbria, from prehistoric to modern times. David Johnson uses photographs accompanied by extended captions to reveal how slate, granite, limestone, clay, and gypsum were extracted from rock faces or dug out of the ground.

Freshwater-Fish-in-England

Review – Freshwater Fish in England

This book provides an eminently readable overview of freshwater fishing, redressing the focus on sea fishing that has dominated archaeological narratives in recent years. The author is a leading fish-bone specialist, so there is mention of archaeological data, including isotopic analyses of human bones as proxies for diet.

Finds-Identified

Review – Finds Identified

This new book, Finds Identified, is a chunky volume celebrating the rich material culture of England and Wales. Brimming with information on archaeological objects dating from the prehistoric to the modern period, it is richly illustrated with images from the online database of the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS).

Excavation of the Bitterley Hoard

Redefining ‘Treasure’: a public consultation and new guidance for landowners

The Heritage Minister has proposed a series of changes for the way Treasure finds are processed, and the PAS has released new metal-detecting guidance for landowners. With recorded Treasure finds hitting a record high for the second year running (CA 347), Heritage Minister Michael Ellis MP has launched a public consultation on a review of […]

Fan

Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from issues 201-300, part I

In my last two columns I picked some favourite covers from issues 101-200 (1986-2005) of Current Archaeology. I continue this series in the next two columns, focusing on CA 201-300 (2006-2015). Current Archaeology readers of this period and onwards benefited from the wider shift in publishing that had taken place in the early 2000s, when the cost of using colour in magazines dropped dramatically. The CAs of the 2000s are thus full-colour, 60-page editions that seem light years away from the magazine’s humble black-and-white, 20-page origins. But while much had changed in publishing and archaeology alike, the sites and stories range as widely as ever. Here are some of my personal favourites.

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