Wales

Wales

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Current Archaeology 358 – now on sale

Our cover feature explores a significant change of heart: why were Silchester’s Roman baths demolished in the 1st century, just as the lavish complex was nearing completion, only to be rebuilt on an even grander scale? We visit the latest excavations at the Roman town to find out more. Continuing our watery theme, Wales’ more […]

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Shipwreck found at Pensarn Beach

Extreme weather has exposed the wreck of a ship, believed to have sunk 150 years ago off the coast of North Wales. Storms in July at Pensarn Beach, Abergele, removed the sandbanks covering the wreck, revealing the ship lying on its keel near a tidal pond in an area known as ‘Abergele Roads’. The lower […]

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Buried secrets revealed at Dinas Dinlle coastal fort

August saw the first ever archaeological excavation to be carried out at the iconic north Wales prehistoric coastal fort of Dinas Dinlle, owned by the National Trust. The hillfort, which is mentioned in the Welsh legends of the Mabinogi, is being dramatically cut by coastal erosion. Between 20m and 40m of the western side has […]

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Review – Avanke, Bever, Castor: the story of beavers in Wales

In this fascinating book, Bryony Coles charts the history of beavers in Wales, from their earliest evidence dating to the Ice Age (found in Pontnewydd Cave in North Wales) to historical evidence that suggests that they continued to exist in Wales as late as the 18th century. The book explores the biology and behaviour of beavers and the physical evidence of their presence, and along the way considers the impact they had in medieval and later culture.

Strata Florida Archaeology Field School

The Strata Florida Archaeology Field School (SFAFS) will open its doors (and trenches) for the very first time in 2019! Come and join us for what will be an exciting founding year! Strata Florida Abbey (Abaty Ystrad Fflur in Welsh) is a captivating, evocative and internationally significant site located in the foothills of the Cambrian […]

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Out of the Ashes: Seeking the origins of the first people of Stonehenge

In a research project originally published in Scientific Reports, Dr Christophe Snoeck and researchers from the University of Oxford, the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, the Université libre de Bruxelles, the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, and University College London have used isotope analysis to examine some of the cremated human remains excavated at Stonehenge, with fascinating results. Their findings highlight not only how mobile some Neolithic populations were, and how important Stonehenge was to them, but also the lengths to which they may have been willing to go to bury their dead on the site.

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Did the people buried at Stonehenge come from Wales?

Recent analysis of cremated human remains excavated from Stonehenge has shown that some of the individuals buried at the Neolithic monument may have spent some of their lives in western Britain, or even west Wales – the same region where the Stonehenge bluestones are believed to have come from.

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Current Archaeology 337

Scattered across England, a host of monumental mounds have long been interpreted as Norman castle mottes. Large round mounds boast a much earlier pedigree, however – as this month’s cover star, Silbury Hill, attests. A recent project has been investigating whether any sisters to Silbury are hiding in plain sight – with some surprising results.

CAERLEON SAMIAN GROUP - Roman Samian Pottery Workshops

Roman Samian Pottery Workshops

National Museum of Wales holds pottery workshops in Caerleon and Cardiff during the year. These take the form of a half day meeting on Tuesdays across some 6 weeks. That in the autumn of 2019 at Caerleon will be working on Roman samian from the Legionary Fortress. An enthusiasm for Roman pottery and a willingness […]

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New Treasure finds from North-east Wales

Seven finds uncovered in Wrexham and Flintshire during 2015 and 2016 have been declared Treasure by the Coroner for North-east Wales. The discoveries, dated from the Roman through to the post-medieval period, include a coin hoard as well as fine medieval jewellery.

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