Wales

Wales

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Out of the Ashes: Seeking the origins of the first people of Stonehenge

In a research project originally published in Scientific Reports, Dr Christophe Snoeck and researchers from the University of Oxford, the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, the Université libre de Bruxelles, the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, and University College London have used isotope analysis to examine some of the cremated human remains excavated at Stonehenge, with fascinating results. Their findings highlight not only how mobile some Neolithic populations were, and how important Stonehenge was to them, but also the lengths to which they may have been willing to go to bury their dead on the site.

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Did the people buried at Stonehenge come from Wales?

Recent analysis of cremated human remains excavated from Stonehenge has shown that some of the individuals buried at the Neolithic monument may have spent some of their lives in western Britain, or even west Wales – the same region where the Stonehenge bluestones are believed to have come from.

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Current Archaeology 337

Scattered across England, a host of monumental mounds have long been interpreted as Norman castle mottes. Large round mounds boast a much earlier pedigree, however – as this month’s cover star, Silbury Hill, attests. A recent project has been investigating whether any sisters to Silbury are hiding in plain sight – with some surprising results.

CAERLEON SAMIAN GROUP - Roman Samian Pottery Workshops

Roman Samian Pottery Workshops

National Museum Wales holds pottery workshops in Cardiff during the year. That in the autumn of 2018 will be working on Roman samian stamps from Wales and on plain samian from various Welsh sites. An enthusiasm for Roman pottery and a willingness to learn are the main requirements, rather than any specific knowledge of pottery. […]

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New Treasure finds from North-east Wales

Seven finds uncovered in Wrexham and Flintshire during 2015 and 2016 have been declared Treasure by the Coroner for North-east Wales. The discoveries, dated from the Roman through to the post-medieval period, include a coin hoard as well as fine medieval jewellery.

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Moel-y-Gaer, Bodfari

Moel-y-Gaer, Bodfari is a small hillfort in a beautiful location at the northern end of the Clwydian mountains. It is about 5 miles north-east of Denbigh overlooking the village of Bodfari. In previous years we have carried out extensive survey work and excavation is ongoing. In 2018 we shall be working on trenches located at […]

CADW - Bryn Celli Ddu Landscape Project

Bryn Celli Ddu Landscape Project

Bryn Celli Ddu is a Neolithic passage tomb on Anglesey, in northwest Wales, and this project focuses on the landscape surrounding this famous tomb. During the last three years we have built up a picture that includes a Late Neolithic / Bronze Age cairn, a Neolithic pic circle, along with several rock art panels situated […]

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Neolithic wanderings in Wales

The Mesolithic–Neolithic transition in Britain is a widely debated topic, particularly with regard to the role migration played in spreading Neolithic farming practices from the Continent to Britain. Now researchers from Durham University are using isotope analysis to examine the childhood origins of early Neolithic Britons, in an initiative aiming to address this question.

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Ruminations on food supply at the Roman fortress of Caerleon

It is a problem not often considered: the difficulty of feeding armies while they are hundreds of miles from home or any of their allies. Previously, it was taken for granted that supplies were procured from local sources. But a new study by Dr Peter Guest and Dr Richard Madgwick of Cardiff University, with colleagues […]

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Wales’ earliest village?

Exploring a Neolithic neighbourhood at Llanfaethlu Since 2014, archaeological work at Llanfaethlu, on the north coast of Anglesey, has been revealing the remains of the first early Neolithic multi-house settlement to be found in north Wales. Catherine Rees and Matthew Jones explain further. When our work began at Llanfaethlu, the site had already been identified […]

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