Tudor

Tudor

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Review – 1520: the Field of the Cloth of Gold

Published 500 years after the event took place, this book serves as a quincentenary celebration of the legendary first meeting between Henry VIII, the English king (r. 1509-1547), and Francis I, the French king (r. 1515-1547). Known as the Field of the Cloth of Gold, the festivities were held over the course of two weeks in June 1520 and served as an attempt at brokering a friendship between the two often-combative nations.

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BETWEEN THE CRACKS

Investigations beneath the floorboards of Oxburgh Hall, a great moated country house near King’s Lynn, have revealed a remarkable time capsule of finds spanning 500 years, from high-status manuscripts to Tudor textiles. Anna Forrest describes some of the highlights.

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X-ray analysis of chainmail from the Mary Rose

Analysis by X-ray of three copper-alloy artefacts recovered from the wreck of the Mary Rose has offered new insight into their construction and the success of conservation efforts undertaken on them. 

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Dig the Tudors at Sudeley Castle

Sudeley Castle was one of the Tudors’ most beloved palaces. It’s where Anne Boleyn stayed with Henry VIII while he made his decision to dissolve the monasteries, and where Katherine Parr, Henry’s last wife, later lived after he died. But hidden in the castle grounds, DigVentures has found traces of yet another remarkable moment in […]

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Mapping medieval maritime merchants

Researchers at the University of Southampton have undertaken the mammoth task of mapping the complex network of merchant trading routes and ports that operated during the late medieval and Tudor periods. The project team analysed 50,000 ship movements between more than 600 ports in England and Wales from AD 1400-1580, scouring heaps of data from custom accounts, navy payrolls, and national ship surveys.

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We Dig Wollaton Park 2020

PLEASE NOTE THE 2020 EXCAVATION SEASON HAS BEEN CANCELLED Details Held annually since 2015, We Dig… Nottingham’s annual training excavation, is a partnership between Trent & Peak Archaeology, the University of Nottingham and Nottingham City Council. We Dig… Wollaton Park continues archaeological investigations of the formal gardens of Wollaton Hall, searching for evidence of buildings […]

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Elsyng Palace

A 17th season of work on the scheduled ancient monument, home of a series of nationally important figures beginning in the Wars of the Roses and then a Tudor royal palace, will aim to locate the moated inner gatehouse. With previous work about to be published in a major monograph, the dig will begin to […]

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Electrifying discoveries at Hampton Court Palace

Hampton Court Palace is currently undergoing a massive, multiphased electrical upgrade, its first since the 1960s, which has provided the rare opportunity to carry out archaeological excavations on the site before the new infrastructure is installed.

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Highlighting Hull’s Tudor history

In 1997, archaeologists excavating ahead of the construction of an access road for The Deep – the aquarium on the east bank of the River Hull – discovered that the Tudor-era South Blockhouse survived almost intact, with nothing built on it. One of the major finds included a breech-loading canon, similar to those on the […]

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Tudor traces of Greenwich Palace revealed

Work to create a new visitor centre at the Old Royal Naval College has uncovered long-lost traces of Greenwich Palace – the birthplace of Henry VIII and his daughters Mary and Elizabeth I. Although nothing of Greenwich Palace survives above the ground today, its scale and opulence of design were comparable to Hampton Court, with […]

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