stonehenge

Secret-Britain

Review – Secret Britain: unearthing our mysterious past

As advances in archaeological science march on, we are increasingly able to answer questions of ‘when’ and ‘how’ when investigating sites and artefacts. But what about ‘why’? In this attractively presented and impressively wide-ranging book, Mary-Ann Ochota invites us to explore the possibilities of some of Britain’s most enigmatic discoveries.

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Science Notes – Studying the stones of Stonehenge

Lithological provenancing has featured heavily in the pages of Current Archaeology recently. In one of last month’s features, we discussed the recent evidence behind the potential origins of the Stonehenge bluestones, and this month we are examining the source of the monument’s celebrated sarsens. As we have yet to explore petrology or geochemistry within ‘Science Notes’, I thought it a good opportunity to rectify this and delve into the details of some of the techniques used for these projects.

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Current Archaeology 367

Our cover feature takes us to the lofty attic spaces of a grand country house: Oxburgh Hall in Norfolk, where ambitious conservation work has revealed a wealth of fragile finds spanning 500 years, including the astonishing illuminated manuscript page that appears on the front of this issue. Some 200 miles from Oxburgh’s red-brick splendour stands […]

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Provenancing the stones

Where did the Stonehenge bluestones come from? Scientific advances are allowing us to pinpoint the outcrops that they were quarried from with ever-greater accuracy. Rob Ixer, Richard Bevins, and Duncan Pirrie describe some of the latest thinking.

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Current Archaeology 366

Last summer, we ran a feature about the long-running excavation at Poulton, near Chester, which was then exploring a cemetery associated with a medieval farming community. Within the grave fills, however, the team found far older artefacts: hints of earlier occupation. Now they have revealed the remains of a completely unexpected Iron Age and Romano-British […]

Historic-landscapes

Review – Historic Landscapes and Mental Well-being

As the title of this book suggests, historic landscapes have the potential to improve the lives of those experiencing mental ill-health, by exploring the therapeutic relationship between people and ancient places.

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Review – Your Stonehenge

Visitors to Stonehenge have been taking photographs of the monument – and themselves – for almost 150 years. Lucia Marchini visited the site to explore a new exhibition showcasing some of these images, and the stories they tell.

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Review – Conversations in making

Contemporary art is on view at Stonehenge’s visitor centre for the first time. Lucia Marchini went along to take a look and find out more about an artistic approach to archaeology.

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