Roman Britain

Londinium

Review – Londinium: a biography

A biography normally explores the life of an individual person, but in this wide-ranging new book, Richard Hingley (Professor of Roman Archaeology at the University of Durham) tells the story of an entire town and the lives and livelihoods of its occupants over the course of five centuries.

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Further finds along the A14

Extensive archaeological work during Highways England’s A14 improvement scheme in Cambridgeshire has revealed a wealth of features spanning thousands of years (see CA 339). As the excavations draw towards their close, further finds are continuing to emerge.

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The Londinium diet

A recent study, conducted by researchers from the Centre for Human Bioarchaeology at the Museum of London and Durham University, has looked into the diet of Roman London. Children were of particular interest to the team, as they may have had a different diet to that of adults due to their lower social status in Roman culture.

Protecting-the-Roman-Empire

Review – Protecting the Roman Empire: fortlets, frontiers, and the quest for post-conquest security

The Roman army is a well-studied aspect of the ancient empire it served, and tourists frequently visit the remains of legionary fortresses and auxiliary forts across the former territory of the Roman Empire. Yet the less famous (though equally important) small installations of fortlets and towers are fundamental to understanding how the Roman army functioned, both as a conquering body and as a defensive force. In this work, Symonds offers the first synthetic analysis of these under-appreciated and intriguing outpost structures.

Britannia-Romana

Review – Britannia Romana: Roman inscriptions and Roman Britain

Visiting any of the great national museums on the Continent (even the regional and local ones, come to that), students of Roman Britain could be forgiven for walking about the galleries filled floor to ceiling with altars, tombstones, and public inscriptions awestruck, but also a little downcast. What has Britain got to compare with it?

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Review – Roman Britain: the frontier province

This collection of papers by Mark Hassall, for many years a lecturer at UCL’s Institute of Archaeology and co-editor of the epigraphic roundup for the journal Britannia, takes as its model a 1953 collection, Roman Britain and the Roman Army, by the eminent scholar of Roman Britain Eric Birley. Like that volume, this current collection takes stock of previously published research to present an academic ‘greatest hits’ compilation.

Hadrian's Wall on Tyneside-1

Review – Hadrian’s Wall on Tyneside

Nick Hodgson Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums, £4.99 ISBN 978-0905974964 Review Matthew Symonds If you imagine Hadrian’s Wall, in your mind’s eye you will probably see it majestically crowning precipitous crags. Despite the drama of such a setting, it would be an anomaly. For most of its course, the Wall traverses more moderate terrain. […]

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