Prehistory

The-Prehistory-of-Britain-and-Ireland

Review – The Prehistory of Britain and Ireland

This is a thoroughly revised, weighty second edition, and can be regarded as a companion piece to Richard Bradley’s recently co-authored and more broadly focused The Later Prehistory of North-west Europe (2015). This book concentrates on those few islands on the western fringes, blinking in and out of Europe, and proceeds to examine their history closely.

Making-a-Mark

Review – Making a Mark: image and process in Neolithic Britain and Ireland

Making a Mark focuses on decorated portable artefacts from mainly the Neolithic, and provides the reader with an excellent discussion forum. Across the book’s 15 chapters, the authors discuss a number of issues, such as the would-be relationship between certain motifs found on both portable and static art (for instance, passage grave megalithic art). For this, the authors use several core areas of Neolithic Britain and Ireland.

Clifton-Quarry,-Worcestershire

Clifton Quarry, Worcestershire: pits, pots and cereals

Clifton Quarry is a key site for the prehistory of the West Midlands. The outstanding discovery was an early Iron Age settlement, dating from a short period in the 6th to 4th centuries BC, consisting of numerous four-post structures, but curiously with no clear evidence for roundhouses. Charred grain and charcoal from the post-holes of the four-posters suggest that they burnt down and supports the idea that such structures were granaries.

Unearthing-Childhood-

Unearthing Childhood: young lives in prehistory

Robin Derricourt’s book is an overview of current and past research on the nature of the evidence for children in prehistory. As he points out, children are likely to have comprised about 50% of the population of most prehistoric societies, and so it is high time they were studied to the same degree as adults.

Scanning-Electron-Micrograph-of-a-thread-showing-a-splice-in-one-of-the-single-thread-elements,-Cave-of-the-Warrior,-Israel_Image,-M-Gleba,-S-Harris,-with-permission-of-Israel-Antiquities-Authority

Spinning the tale of prehistoric textiles

It has long been assumed that the technique of spinning thread has a lengthy and robust history. New evidence, though, suggests that a different way of making thread – called splicing – was instead the norm throughout most of Europe and the Near East during prehistory.

Sites of Prehistoric Life in Northern Ireland_1

Review – Sites of Prehistoric Life in Northern Ireland

Neither Harry nor June Welsh require an introduction in Northern Irish archaeology, being the authors – both jointly and separately – of two publications on the province’s heritage: Tomb Travel (2011) and The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland (2014). Their most recent is very much the companion volume to the burial sites book.

EBA_Barrows_Reconstruction_Final

Sherford communities old and new: Exploring millennia of settlement in Devon

The creation of a new town on the eastern side of Plymouth has afforded a rare opportunity to investigate a wide multi-period archaeological landscape, revealing the hidden secrets of the people who lived there centuries before. Gareth Chaffey and Matt Kendall explain how these discoveries are pushing back the boundaries of our understanding of southern Devon’s past.

ca_OUTNOWbanner_new

Current Archaeology 338

Over 4,500 years ago, the Bell Beaker phenomenon swept across much of Europe. The resulting changes to burial practices and technology are clear in the archaeological record, but the origins of these ideas were obscure. Now ancient DNA analysis has revolutionised this picture –and revealed that the impact on the make-up of Britain’s population was […]

1 2