Neolithic

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Dairy consumption in Neolithic Britain

A recent study has identified the first direct evidence of milk consumption by humans anywhere in the world, by analysing the teeth of Neolithic individuals from Britain.

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Review – Mining and Quarrying in Neolithic Europe: a social perspective

These 12 quite disparate papers cover mining/quarrying of flint, chert, and other fine-grained silicic rocks within the British Isles (and Norway), although French flint-mining is necessarily discussed. More basic rocks, notably the Preseli Hills dolerite and Lake District volcaniclastics (Group VI axes and bracers), and the Mesolithic to Neolithic transition are also explored.

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Successful surveying at Brú na Bóinne

The most recent season of surveying at Brú na Bóinne in County Meath, Ireland, has proven very successful, identifying 40 previously unrecorded structures (one is pictured below) and demonstrating just how prominent this landscape was throughout prehistory and into the medieval period. Since 2014, Dr Steve Davis from the UCD School of Archaeology has been […]

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Summer of finds at the Ness of Brodgar

As this year’s dig season at the Ness of Brodgar came to an end, an international team of archaeologists uncovered a surprising subterranean structure, shedding more light on the sophistication of the first farmers who built this site 5,000 years ago.

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Investigating Carrowmore’s unusual monument

Excavation in the Carrowmore complex of megalithic monuments in County Sligo, Ireland, known for its prehistoric passage tombs, has shed interesting new light on one of the supposed burial mounds on the site.

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Rethinking Scottish crannogs

New excavation and analysis of three crannogs – or man-made islands – in the Outer Hebrides has clearly demonstrated that they had Neolithic origins, changing our understanding of these enigmatic sites.

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Finding the origins of the first farmers

A recent ancient DNA study looking at the genetics of Neolithic Britons provides strong evidence to suggest that the shift to farming in Britain was due to migration from the Continent and not from local populations adopting agricultural methods – something that has been hotly debated for decades.

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Science Notes – Fashioning the face of man’s best friend

Facial reconstructions have become an increasingly common output of archaeological analysis. From the dark-skinned Cheddar Man (see CA 337) to the battle-scarred men from the Mary Rose, these life-like models put a face (literally) on the past in a way that artefacts cannot. Now, a reconstruction has been created from the skull of a Neolithic dog, opening up new possibilities for the ways in which this forensic technique may be used in the future. But how are these models created, and how accurate are they? In this month’s ’Science Notes‘, we explore the details of this technique and how it was applied to a canine from Orkney.

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