MOLA

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Setting the stage at Shakespeare’s Curtain Theatre

Post-excavation analysis of the Curtain Theatre in Shoreditch, which staged some of Shakespeare’s plays (see CA 316), has revealed new clues to how the Elizabethan playhouse was used. Among the key discoveries revealed by MOLA archaeologists was that the theatre’s stage was the same length as a modern-day fencing piste – 14m from stage left to stage right, and 4.75m deep – making it perfect for performing elaborate fight scenes.

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Beating London’s bodysnatchers

Archaeological work under the Crossrail project has uncovered evidence of bodysnatching in the City of London. Construction of the capital’s new Elizabeth Line has created one of the most extensive archaeological programmes ever undertaken in the UK (see CA 313 and 327), and work on the Broadgate entrance to the new Crossrail station at Liverpool […]

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Excavating the CA archive: Roman archaeology

Joe Flatman explores half a century of reports from the past. A selection of articles mentioned by Joe Flatman in this month’s column below can be accessed for free for one month via Exact Editions, starting 3 August. Use the links within the text to jump to the individual articles, or click on the covers below. […]

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Great Ryburgh: A remarkable Anglo-Saxon cemetery revealed

Archaeological work beside the River Wensum in Norfolk has revealed more than 80 rare Middle Saxon log coffins and plank-lined graves, preserved by their waterlogged environment – the first time that such coffins have been found in these numbers and such good condition in Britain. What can the unusual finds tell us about an early […]

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Time Truck: London’s local archaeology

Today (Friday 9 September) is MOLA’s Time Truck’s last day at Bishops Square. Surrounded by tall commercial buildings, behind the high-end cosmetics shops of Old Spitalfields Market, the pop-up exhibition offers a chance to explore everyday life in east London in the 17th-19th centuries. With staff from MOLA on hand to explain the selection of […]

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Earliest written reference to London found

The earliest-known written reference to London was revealed today (1 June) by MOLA archaeologists, as part of Britain’s largest, earliest, and most significant group of Roman waxed writing tablets. The reference forms part of an address – Londinio Mogontio, ‘To Mogontius [a Celtic personal name], in London’, and appears on a writing tablet dating from c.AD […]