mesolithic

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Searching for the Storegga tsunami in Doggerland

The Storegga tsunami, caused by the sudden shift of a Scotland-sized section of the seabed off the coast of modern-day Norway, raged across the North Sea approximately 8,150 years ago. Archaeological evidence for this event has been found in onshore sediments across western Scandinavia, in parts of north-east Britain, and even as far away as Greenland. But, although models of the tsunami suggest that it possibly affected parts of the southern North Sea, no concrete evidence for it had been found in this region – until now.

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All in the family: genetic links in prehistoric Ireland

A project, headed by researchers from Trinity College Dublin, has sequenced the DNA of more than 40 individuals excavated from both Mesolithic and Neolithic funerary contexts across Ireland. The results illuminate not only the Irish transition to an agrarian way of life but also the social hierarchies that might have formed during this time.

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Review – Into the Wildwoods: explore the Mesolithic in Scotland’s native woodlands

This teaching resource is a companion to 2019’s The First Foresters (see CA 350), which focuses on the Neolithic occupants of Scotland’s woodlands. Into the Wildwoods delves further back in time, introducing the hunter-gatherers of the later Mesolithic (c.5800-4000 BC) in a way that will engage 8- to 12-year-olds, while also incorporating ideas about the natural world around them.

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SECRETS OF THE BLACK ISLE

Excavations on a Highland peninsula have uncovered a rich archaeological landscape spanning thousands of years. From a possible Mesolithic structure and an enigmatic ‘promontory fort’ to a monumental Pictish barrow cemetery, Eric Grant takes us through some of the highlights.

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Current Archaeology 360

North of Inverness lies the evocatively named ‘Black Isle’ – a fertile peninsula that has hosted human activity for 10,000 years. Since 2017, community excavations have uncovered a wealth of finds from rare Mesolithic antler objects to a monumental Pictish barrow cemetery. Our first feature tours highlights from this productive project. The effort that went […]

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Mesolithic structure with surviving timbers found at Killerby Quarry

The earliest example of a house with surviving timbers to be found in the United Kingdom is thought to have been identified in North Yorkshire. Archaeological Research Services (ARS) discovered the remains of two timber structures preserved in peat while working at Tarmac’s Killerby Quarry site.

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