London

London

London's-industrial-past

Review – London’s Industrial Past

London’s industrial past is an important part of the city’s history, but much of the physical evidence is now being lost to demolition and redevelopment projects. Here, Mark Amies sets out to address this, examining many of the important factories and industries that were once found across London.

London's-lost-rivers

Review – London’s Lost Rivers: a walker’s guide – volume two

In this second volume of London’s Lost Rivers, Tom Bolton presents the history of the city along nine of its more obscure rivers. Through the suggested walks along the routes of rivers such as Bollo Brook, Counters Creek, and Black Ditch, which once ran through the city but are now lost or buried underground, readers are able to follow the development of the landscape over time.

Manufactured-bodies

Review – Manufactured Bodies: the impact of industrialisation on London health

Forged from a project funded by the City of London Archaeological Trust, this volume weaves together archaeological, historical, and modern-day public health data, resulting in an impressive resource for understanding the health of Londoners past and present. Focusing on data collected from human skeletal remains of nearly 2,400 individuals from 24 pre-industrial (1066–1750) and industrial (1750–1900) sites across Britain, it implements cutting-edge digital radiographic and computerised tomography (CT) analysis on an unprecedented scale.

Aerial-view-of-MOLA-excavating-Principal-Place

Science Notes – Bridging the gap in London’s prehistory

Over recent decades, developments in radiocarbon dating techniques have revolutionised our ability to establish the age of archaeological material and to interpret the past (see CA 359). In this month’s Science Notes we will be exploring how, thanks to further advances in this field, ‘the most significant group of Early Neolithic pottery ever uncovered in London’ has shed intriguing light on the capital’s prehistoric past.

MOLA-archaeologist-in-cesspit

Medieval remains under Somerset House

Excavations at the Courtauld Institute of Art at Somerset House, London, have uncovered a cesspit belonging to one of the luxurious medieval mansions that used to exist in this area.

Mudlarking

Review – Mudlarking: lost and found on the River Thames

The tidal reach of the River Thames is the longest archaeological site in Britain, its rhythmically rising and falling waters exposing a wealth of material spanning millennia of human activity along its banks. For the last decade, thousands of features and objects have been recorded by the Thames Discovery Programme and its volunteers – but people have also been exploring the foreshore and its finds on a more informal basis for centuries.

EMAS at Leacanabuaile Fort

The EMAS Archaeological Society

EMAS was founded in 1988 as the University of London Extra-Mural Archaeological Society and was initially open to anyone who was a past, or present, student of the University of London Extra-Mural Certificate and Diploma Classes.

Citadel-of-the-Saxons

Review – Citadel of the Saxons: the rise of early London

Written with an evocative turn of phrase and a sharp eye for interesting detail, Citadel of the Saxons is packed full of information, and impressive in its scope given that it is under 200 pages long. Rory begins his account in the 5th century amidst the ruins of Roman London, before tracing the settlement’s rebirth and rise to new heights of prosperity, ending with the Norman Conquest of 1066.

London's-Crypts-&-Catacombs

London’s Crypts and Catacombs

Asked to think about catacombs, our minds might initially turn to the grand subterranean ossuaries of, say, Rome or Paris. However, London is not without its own underground burial places. In this brief but enjoyable book, authors Robert Bard and Adrian Miles take readers on a tour of former and extant catacombs and other hidden structures within and below some of the best-known cemeteries in the capital.

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