Joe Flatman

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Excavating the CA archive: Yorkshire, part I

There are some places so rich in archaeological remains and so cherished is their history that, in my run of county reviews, I have been nervous to tread there. One such location, Yorkshire, is the focus of this issue and the next – though two columns seem the least possible space needed to do justice to an incredible archaeological story. I will take a chronological approach, featuring all of the historic counties: North Yorkshire, including the Dales and Moors; the East Riding, including the Humber Estuary and Wolds; and South and West Yorkshire.

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Excavating the CA archive: Derbyshire

In the previous two issues, I began on the Wirral coast of Merseyside, before heading inland to Liverpool and Greater Manchester, and then on to Cheshire. I continue my journey through the north-west of England in this column, travelling further east into Derbyshire.

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Excavating the CA archive: Cheshire

In the last issue of CA, I explored the archaeology of Merseyside, Liverpool, and Manchester. This month, I head into the surrounding countryside of modern-day Cheshire. The county is rich in prehistoric, Roman, and medieval remains.

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Excavating the CA archive: The National Trust, 1986-2005

This latest column continues the thread that I began last month, exploring Current Archaeology’s coverage of sites in the care of the National Trust. Last time I looked at stories from issues 1-100 (1967-1986), and this month I delve into issues 101-200, spanning 1986 to 2005.

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Excavating the CA archive: The National Trust, 1967-1987

Recently I accepted a new position at the National Trust, working across south-east England on the amazing sites and landscapes in the Trust’s care. With this change in roles, it seemed appropriate to devote my next few columns to National Trust sites that have appeared in the pages of CA down the years. I am pleased to report that such appearances have been regular and diverse, featuring sites spanning prehistory to the late 20th century and ranging across the country. This column focuses on some of the Trust’s sites – and the stories that appeared about them – from the first two decades of the magazine, between 1967 and 1987.

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Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from issues 301 onwards

In this final column exploring the stories behind Current Archaeology cover images, I am bringing things right up to date by examining covers from issue 301 (April 2015) onwards. Despite the challenging environment for archaeology in recent years, with particularly worrying cutbacks in local-authority heritage services, there has still been some amazing work and some spectacular sites and finds to celebrate.

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Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from issues 201-300, part I

In my last two columns I picked some favourite covers from issues 101-200 (1986-2005) of Current Archaeology. I continue this series in the next two columns, focusing on CA 201-300 (2006-2015). Current Archaeology readers of this period and onwards benefited from the wider shift in publishing that had taken place in the early 2000s, when the cost of using colour in magazines dropped dramatically. The CAs of the 2000s are thus full-colour, 60-page editions that seem light years away from the magazine’s humble black-and-white, 20-page origins. But while much had changed in publishing and archaeology alike, the sites and stories range as widely as ever. Here are some of my personal favourites.

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Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from issues 101-200, part II

In last month’s column I highlighted some of my favourite covers from issues 101-200 (1986- 2005). Now I pick up where I left off, continuing my explorations of this era through the pages of Current Archaeology, and roving in time from the 3rd millennium BC to the 18th century AD, and in space from northern Scotland to the south coast of England.

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Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from issues 101-200, part I

In last month’s column, I picked some of my favourite covers from the first hundred issues of Current Archaeology, the years 1967-1986, a period that has come to be seen by some as a ‘golden age’ of rescue archaeology, and by others less happily as a desperate scramble to gather sufficient resources to stem the tide of destruction. Continuing with this theme, in this and next month’s column I will explore the stories behind some of the covers in issues 101-200, the years 1986-2005.

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