Iron Age

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Contact, conquest, and Cartimandua

Long-running improvement works on a section of the A1 have uncovered rare traces of how contact with the Roman Empire transformed a northern Iron Age settlement at a key routeway junction. Carly Hilts reports.

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Current Archaeology 365 – now on sale

Our cover story takes us to the territory of the Iron Age Brigantes, in what is now North Yorkshire. There, major works on the A1 have revealed extensive settlement remains, telling a powerful story of how a community’s first contacts with the Roman Empire brought unprecedented prosperity, but also set wheels in motion for the […]

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DNA analysis sheds light on whalebone use in Iron Age Orkney

Recent DNA analysis of whalebone artefacts found at The Cairns, Orkney, has shed light on the relationship between these marine mammals and the site’s Iron Age community, as well as hinting why the large local broch may have been demolished in the 2nd century AD.

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Current Archaeology 362

This month’s cover feature explores material remains of the railway revolution that transformed early Victorian England. Birmingham’s former Curzon Street Station was a key part of this flourishing transport network, and with the site set to become a rail hub once more as part of HS2, fascinating echoes of 19th-century journeys have come to light. […]

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Review – 50 Roman Finds from the Portable Antiquities Scheme

Like its predecessors, this new book in the ‘50 Finds’ series presents a range of carefully selected artefacts in a well-illustrated, brief volume, which highlights the way in which the material record vividly reflects life in the past. With the Roman period represented by more finds than any other in the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) database, the authors have chosen a wide variety of both exceptional and everyday objects that reflect the interactions between Roman and Iron Age cultures in Britain.

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Arms and the man

Over 2,000 years ago, in what today is West Sussex but at the time lay within the territory of the Iron Age Regni tribe, an elaborate funeral was taking place. The man being laid to rest was an important and seemingly well-respected individual, with his mourners sending him to the grave accompanied by an extraordinary array of warrior regalia – a rare honour in a region where, at this time, cremation was the norm.

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Current Archaeology 361

Jersey and Guernsey are famous for their prehistoric archaeology, but the smaller Channel Island of Sark is less well known. Since 2004, though, Barry Cunliffe has been striving to bring the stories of its earliest inhabitants to light. Lying closer to France than to Britain, the Channel Islands show close cultural ties to the Continent […]

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Walberton’s ‘warrior’ burial

The grave of a late Iron Age or early Roman ‘warrior’, who had been laid to rest with a sword and spear, has been discovered in Walberton, West Sussex.

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