Hadrian’s Wall

Hadrians-Wall

Hadrian’s Wall: 3 days, 300 people, 40 years of research

More than 300 people came along to celebrate 40 years of Hadrian’s Wall research at our special conference on 2-4 September, organised in partnership with Durham University and sponsored by Andante Travels. The celebratory weekend began on Friday with a tour to Vindolanda and Housesteads with Andante Travels, led by expert guides Mark Corney and David […]

ca318_OUTNOWbanner_new

Current Archaeology 318

Neolithic tombs are often seen as ‘houses for the dead’. Striking similarities between the residences of the living and repositories for the deceased have long suggested a symbolic link, but could it be the other way round? Evidence from Orkney suggests that the departed were being laid to rest in their cairns for about 300 […]

Hadrians-Wall

Hadrian’s Wall: 40 Years of Frontier Research

Current Archaeology Live!  presents a special conference, in partnership with Durham University: Hadrian’s Wall: 40 Years of Frontier Research 2-4 September 2016, at Durham University Join us in September for a conference celebrating one of Britain’s greatest archaeological treasures. Hadrian’s Wall is the most famous example of a Roman frontier, but it is also the most mysterious. Far more massive […]

T41a

Divide and Conquer: Hadrian’s Wall and the native population

For decades it was believed that the army on Hadrian’s Wall peacefully co-existed with a local farming community flourishing under the pax Romana. Now, as Nick Hodgson explains, fresh excavations suggest that the frontier stamped out a way of life that had endured for centuries. Archaeologists have always struggled to understand the impact of Hadrian’s […]

Wallsend – The fort at the end of the Wall

Four miles east of Newcastle upon Tyne, Hadrian’s Wall comes to an end. It’s not quite at the sea — Tynemouth is still 4 miles further on, but here the River Tyne is broad enough to allow the Wall to come to an end. Here there is a fort known appropriately as Wallsend from which […]

Chesters Roman fort

Chesters is the nicest of the Hadrian’s Wall forts. It lies 20 miles west of Newcastle and forms the beginning of the dramatic central part of Hadrian’s Wall. Chesters is still ‘civilised’: it lies in fertile farm land at the point where the Wall crosses the river North Tyne.

self-under-umbrella.jpg

Hadrian's Wall Pilgrimage – again

One should not start a project that one cannot complete. Having started writing a blog on the first day of my pilgrimage to Hadrian’s Wall I must confess that I failed to keep it up. It was not for lack of trying. Every night in my room I wrote up my diary, often over 2000 […]

as-web_6611.jpg

The Hadrian's Wall Pilgrimage

The Hadrian’s Wall pilgrimage is going well.   The Pilgrimage is one of the great events of British archaeology.   It began in 1849 when a group of young men decided they would ‘walk the wall’ and it has continued every 10 years since then except for the war years: this is now the 13th […]

TRAN3

Hadrian’s Wall: 30 years on

Thirty years ago, David Breeze and Brian Dobson wrote a history of Hadrian’s Wall from the archaeological evidence. Still in print in a revised edition, it is one of the most successful archaeology books ever written. With a major British Museum exhibition devoted to Hadrian opening this July, we asked David Breeze to take a […]

1 2 3 4