Hadrian’s Wall

Hadrian's-Wall---a-life

Review – Hadrian’s Wall: a life

Although attempts have been made to strip away later activity and present Roman – usually specifically Hadrianic – ruins to modern visitors, traces of the Wall’s afterlife still endure. Such sparse survivals, though, do not reflect the rich legacy of Hadrian’s Wall. That is the story that Richard Hingley, Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, sets out to tell in a fascinating volume that leads us from the Roman period to the 21st century.

EH25113

Interpreting Hadrian’s Wall

How do you explain the latest thinking about a 73-mile-long monument to the public? Visitors to Hadrian’s Wall in recent years may have noticed some changes at the English Heritage sites and museums on the Roman frontier. Frances McIntosh takes us on a tour of the latest developments.

CoverPhoto353_webEWP

The delightful (baker’s) dozen: artefactual insights into Hadrian’s Wall

The 73-mile length of Hadrian’s Wall, as well as the forts and structures associated with it, has yielded thousands of intriguing objects shedding vivid light on life on the Roman frontier. Here are 13 key finds that highlight how the material culture of the monument can enhance our understanding of the people who lived and worked along it.

ca_OUTNOWbanner_new

Current Archaeology 353

In 1849, John Collingwood Bruce led an expedition to Hadrian’s Wall to tour the Roman remains. Since then, this trip – known as the Pilgrimage of Hadrian’s Wall – has been repeated every ten years, and in recent decades CA has marked the anniversary with a special themed issue. With the latest band of Pilgrims […]

The-Pioneer-Burial

Excavating the CA archive: The National Trust, 1967-1987

Recently I accepted a new position at the National Trust, working across south-east England on the amazing sites and landscapes in the Trust’s care. With this change in roles, it seemed appropriate to devote my next few columns to National Trust sites that have appeared in the pages of CA down the years. I am pleased to report that such appearances have been regular and diverse, featuring sites spanning prehistory to the late 20th century and ranging across the country. This column focuses on some of the Trust’s sites – and the stories that appeared about them – from the first two decades of the magazine, between 1967 and 1987.

Roman-writing

Roman writing on the wall

In the depths of a Cumbrian wood, intrepid archaeologists have been abseiling down the wall of a Roman quarry to document eroding inscriptions left by 3rd-century soldiers tasked with harvesting the sandstone to help repair Hadrian’s Wall.

ca_OUTNOWbanner_new

Current Archaeology 351

This month marks 40 years since Wessex Archaeology was founded. Milestone birthdays are often a time of reflection as well as celebration, and in this issue we are exploring four of Wessex Archaeology’s recent projects to shed light on widely contrasting aspects of commercial archaeology. At New Covent Garden Market, Battersea, detailed osteological analysis of […]

Roman-quarry-inscription,-which-is-thought-to-be-done-by-a-detachment-from-the-Second-Legion-under-the-junior-officer-Agricola,-as-well-as-a-presumed-drawingcartoon-of-this-officer

Recording Roman graffiti near Hadrian’s Wall

Rare examples of graffiti, made by the Roman army while they were repairing and rebuilding Hadrian’s Wall, have been recorded in a Cumbrian quarry associated with the monument’s construction. Dating to the early 3rd century AD, these inscriptions have survived for more than 1,800 years, but gradual erosion of the soft sandstone into which they were cut has put them under threat. In an effort to save the graffiti before they are lost, they are being documented by Newcastle University archaeologists in a project funded by Historic England.

ca_OUTNOWbanner_new

Current Archaeology 350

Our cover story takes us to the longest archaeological ‘site’ in Britain: the banks of the River Thames. For ten years, Thames Discovery Programme members have been braving all weathers to record the refuse of centuries of Londoners and newly exposed archaeological features before they are swept away by the tidal river’s ebb and flow. […]

1 2 3 4