Hadrian’s Wall

Protecting-the-Roman-Empire

Review – Protecting the Roman Empire: fortlets, frontiers, and the quest for post-conquest security

The Roman army is a well-studied aspect of the ancient empire it served, and tourists frequently visit the remains of legionary fortresses and auxiliary forts across the former territory of the Roman Empire. Yet the less famous (though equally important) small installations of fortlets and towers are fundamental to understanding how the Roman army functioned, both as a conquering body and as a defensive force. In this work, Symonds offers the first synthetic analysis of these under-appreciated and intriguing outpost structures.

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Review – Hadrian’s Wall on Tyneside

Nick Hodgson Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums, £4.99 ISBN 978-0905974964 Review Matthew Symonds If you imagine Hadrian’s Wall, in your mind’s eye you will probably see it majestically crowning precipitous crags. Despite the drama of such a setting, it would be an anomaly. For most of its course, the Wall traverses more moderate terrain. […]

Hadrian's Wall

Review – Hadrian’s Wall: Archaeology and History at the Limit of Rome’s Empire

Nick Hodgson Robert Hale, £19.99 ISBN 978-0719818158 Review Matthew Symonds Creating the Hadrian’s Wall National Trail has led to a steady rise in guidebooks catering to walkers following the former frontier, but books providing an authoritative biography of the border works remain rare. The standard undergraduate textbook – and entry point for anyone seriously interested […]

Segedunum

Review – Segedunum: Excavations by Charles Daniels in the Roman Fort at Wallsend (1975-1984)

Alan Rushworth and Alexandra Croom Oxbow Books, £55.00 ISBN 978-1785700262 Review Rob Collins The Roman fort of Segedunum is better known by its modern English place-name, Wallsend, which conveniently holds the subtle clue to the fort’s position – at the eastern terminus of Hadrian’s monumental structure. The late Charles Daniels was provided with the opportunity […]

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Current Archaeology 329

To step into Harmondsworth Barn is not just to enter a space so glorious that it was lauded as the ‘cathedral of Middlesex’ by Sir John Betjeman. It is also to experience a remarkably intact medieval interior. Among majestic oak trusses are opportunities to admire medieval technology that has weathered the centuries unaltered. After being […]

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Hard or soft borders? The Roman experience in Britain

What were Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall for, and how did they influence everyday life in their shadow? As questions about modern borders continue to make the headlines, Matthew Symonds investigates Rome’s land frontiers in Britain. Borders are big news at the moment. We all know that a ‘great wall’ is planned along the US […]

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Current Archaeology 326

What are borders for? It is a question that has recently gone mainstream. Debate about ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ borders finds a parallel in attempts to determine whether Roman borders blocked or simply regulated movement. In this regard, the true nature of Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall remains a mystery. As the modern world is reminding us, though, the nature […]

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Excavating the CA Archive: Hadrian’s Wall

Hadrian’s Wall has a special place in British archaeology and especially so in the history of Current Archaeology, being a place that the founders of CA knew and loved before they launched the magazine and to which they have returned repeatedly over the years.

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Current Archaeology 321

Legend has it that the Rothwell charnel chapel was discovered when a grave digger tumbled into an underground vault stacked with bones. This alarming incident brought to light a rare example of an intact medieval ossuary in England. Our cover feature explores why the dead were assembled in this manner, and how common the practice was. […]

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