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Arms and the man

Over 2,000 years ago, in what today is West Sussex but at the time lay within the territory of the Iron Age Regni tribe, an elaborate funeral was taking place. The man being laid to rest was an important and seemingly well-respected individual, with his mourners sending him to the grave accompanied by an extraordinary array of warrior regalia – a rare honour in a region where, at this time, cremation was the norm.

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Bamburgh’s Bowl Hole burials

Two decades of archaeological research have shed vivid light on an Anglo-Saxon community that lived at Bamburgh 1,400 years ago, revealing a surprisingly diverse population. With the findings now presented in a detailed ‘digital ossuary’, what has been learned about these pioneering people?

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Excavating Cataractonium

In 2018, Highways England opened an upgraded section of motorway on the A1 in North Yorkshire. Construction of the new road prompted a series of large-scale excavations, with illuminating results. Stuart Ross and Cath Ross present some of the preliminary findings.

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Silchester’s Roman baths

Why was the monumental Roman bathhouse at Silchester demolished in the 1st century AD, only to be rebuilt on an even grander scale? Mike Fulford guides us through the latest excavations at the Roman town.

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Excavating myths and monsters

In 2017, part of a 1,700-year-old mosaic richly decorated with scenes from Classical mythology was excavated during a community project at Boxford, Berkshire. Two years on, its entire surface has been revealed. Anthony Beeson explores the stories behind its sophisticated motifs.

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The Chew Valley hoard

The most-famous date in English history is said to be 1066 – but what was the immediate impact of the Norman Conquest? We explore a recently discovered coin hoard, the largest of its kind, buried in Somerset c.1068. What can it tell us about the first years after the Battle of Hastings?

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What’s new at Sutton Hoo?

This summer marks 80 years since the Sutton Hoo ship burial was discovered, revolutionising our understanding of the Anglo-Saxon period. The site has just reopened to the public following a £4 million investment. Carly Hilts paid a visit to see how a celebrated story had been presented anew.

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The delightful (baker’s) dozen: artefactual insights into Hadrian’s Wall

The 73-mile length of Hadrian’s Wall, as well as the forts and structures associated with it, has yielded thousands of intriguing objects shedding vivid light on life on the Roman frontier. Here are 13 key finds that highlight how the material culture of the monument can enhance our understanding of the people who lived and worked along it.

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New secrets from Prittlewell: reconstructing a burial chamber fit for a prince

Sixteen years after a spectacular early Anglo-Saxon burial was discovered in Essex, a team of more than 40 archaeological experts – including conservators and finds specialists, ancient timber specialists, and engineers – has produced revolutionary new insights into the lavishly furnished wooden chamber and the man buried there.

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