Archaeobotany

SEM-scan-of-Iron-Age-bread-remains-(c)-Highways-England-courtesy-of-MOLA-Headland

Science Notes – Analysing archaeobotany along the A14

Recent news from post-excavation analysis of the excavations for the A14 Cambridge-to- Huntingdon improvement scheme (see CA 339), which recently won the Current Archaeology Award for Best Rescue Project of 2019, is bringing archaeobotany into the spotlight. Archaeobotanist Lara Gonzalez Carretero has discovered that organic samples taken from the site, dating to the Iron Age, are consistent with the by-product of making beer and may represent the earliest evidence for this process in Britain.

Sweet-chestnut-5-Historic-England

That old chestnut: how sweet chestnuts came to Britain

It has long been thought that sweet chestnut trees were introduced to Britain by the Romans – a belief popularised by 18th-century writers – but new research assessing archaeobotanical samples from this period has now cast doubt on such assumptions.

Environmental Archaeology

Environmental archaeology

Environmental archaeology is the study of the long-term relationship between humans and their environments. It has emerged as a formal sub-discipline within the last 30 years, and become firmly established as an essential component to most excavation projects. The subject is, itself, broken down into further specialisms, including: – Archaeobotany (also known as paleoethnobotany) is […]