Anglo-Saxon

Glass-Vessels

Review – The Glass Vessels of Anglo-Saxon England, c.AD 650-1100

This book presents the first ever national survey of all 2,847 fragments of glass vessels known in England dating from the 7th to 11th centuries. Beyond simply recording these fragments, Rose Broadley quantifies and compares different vessel types and analyses their geographical distribution, presenting a new insight into both glass vessels and life in the Middle Anglo-Saxon period.

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Herefordshire hoard thieves sentenced

Four men have been found guilty of charges associated with theft and failure to declare a hoard of over 300 Anglo-Saxon coins and items of jewellery.

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Review – Great North Museum: Hancock

From Roman temples dedicated to Mithras to Anglo-Saxon stone crosses, Newcastle’s Great North Museum: Hancock explores an array of beliefs and ways of life in the north of England

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Galloway Hoard’s Anglo-Saxon ‘owner’ identified?

Further investigation into the contents of one of the most significant Viking-Age hoards found in Scotland has revealed a man’s name etched onto one of the objects. Discovered in Galloway in 2014, the cache was buried at the start of the 10th century and consists of over 100 objects of silver, gold, and other material.

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Summer of finds on Lindisfarne

From rings and rare Anglo-Saxon namestones, to coins and a medieval oven, this year’s excavation on Lindisfarne has provided a new glimpse at life on the island before, during, and after the 8th-century Viking raid that struck its monastic community.

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Review – The Prittlewell princely burial: excavations at Priory Crescent, 2003

In 2003, an excavation by MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) discovered a spectacular Anglo-Saxon burial chamber at Prittlewell, near Southend-on-Sea. Since then, expert analysis of the burial and its contents has indeed yielded a vast array of new information – the result of which is this absorbing monograph, which is packed with insights from the scientific studies that have been undertaken on the finds.

An Anglo-Saxon enigma

A chance metal-detector find has led to the excavation of a highly unusual 6th-century grave in Gloucestershire.

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Time to axe the Anglo-Saxons?

Did ‘the Anglo-Saxon migrations’ take place, and were Romano-British leaders replaced by those of Germanic descent? Susan Oosthuizen’s new book, The Emergence of the English, is a call to rethink our interpretations of the 5th and 6th centuries AD, reflecting on whether many of the assumptions we make about the period are actually supported by evidence. Interpretations that cannot be upheld should be discarded, she says, and all viable alternative interpretations should be explored for the strongest arguments to be identified. Chris Catling reports.

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What’s new at Sutton Hoo?

This summer marks 80 years since the Sutton Hoo ship burial was discovered, revolutionising our understanding of the Anglo-Saxon period. The site has just reopened to the public following a £4 million investment. Carly Hilts paid a visit to see how a celebrated story had been presented anew.

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