Anglo-Saxon

Planning-in-the-early-medieval-landscape

Review – Planning in the Early in the Early Medieval Landscape

Grave AX at Yeavering remains one of the most-extraordinary discoveries in Anglo-Saxon archaeology. Its occupant lay in a slightly flexed posture, with a goat’s head at the feet, a broken spear laid diagonally across the torso, and, running down the central axis of the grave, above the body, a Roman-style groma.

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Current Archaeology 367 – now on sale

Our cover feature takes us to the lofty attic spaces of a grand country house: Oxburgh Hall in Norfolk, where ambitious conservation work has revealed a wealth of fragile finds spanning 500 years, including the astonishing illuminated manuscript page that appears on the front of this issue. Some 200 miles from Oxburgh’s red-brick splendour stands […]

Role-of-Anglo-Saxon-Great-Hall-Complexes

Review – The Role of Anglo-Saxon Great Hall Complexes in Kingdom Formation, in Comparison and in Context AD 500-750

The site of Yeavering, Northumberland, identified in 1949 and excavated with some precision by Brian Hope-Taylor, remains the most comprehensively excavated great hall complex in Britain, and justifiably takes pride of place in any research on the subject. Yet the importance of this site and its research history has somewhat dominated the subsequent investigations on early medieval palatial complexes, sometimes to the detriment of understanding other sites and landscapes.

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Current Archaeology 366

Last summer, we ran a feature about the long-running excavation at Poulton, near Chester, which was then exploring a cemetery associated with a medieval farming community. Within the grave fills, however, the team found far older artefacts: hints of earlier occupation. Now they have revealed the remains of a completely unexpected Iron Age and Romano-British […]

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Science Notes – Early medieval insights from birch bark tar

Birch bark tar (manufactured by the heating of bark in airtight conditions) has long been prized for its sticky, water resistant, and biocidal properties. Throughout human history it has seen a wide range of uses, including as a sealant (for example, in waterprooing vessels), an adhesive (for hafting weapons, repairing ceramics, or assembling composite objects like jewellery), and in perfume and medicine.

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Anglo-Saxon buildings beneath Bath Abbey

Two buildings found during excavations at Bath Abbey are the first Anglo-Saxon stone structures to be identified within the city, and may belong to the monastery where Edgar was crowned as first King of England, new analysis suggests.

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Bamburgh’s Bowl Hole burials

Two decades of archaeological research have shed vivid light on an Anglo-Saxon community that lived at Bamburgh 1,400 years ago, revealing a surprisingly diverse population. With the findings now presented in a detailed ‘digital ossuary’, what has been learned about these pioneering people?

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Current Archaeology 360

North of Inverness lies the evocatively named ‘Black Isle’ – a fertile peninsula that has hosted human activity for 10,000 years. Since 2017, community excavations have uncovered a wealth of finds from rare Mesolithic antler objects to a monumental Pictish barrow cemetery. Our first feature tours highlights from this productive project. The effort that went […]

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