Tom Brindle, Michael Fulford, and Martyn Allen collect the award for Book of the Year 2020. Photo credit: Adam Stanford/Aerial-Cam
The Book of the Year award for 2020 was won by Life and death in the countryside of Roman Britain. The award was collected by some of the title’s authors: (l-r) Tom Brindle, Michael Fulford, and Martyn Allen. [Photo credit: Adam Stanford/Aerial-Cam]

Winner of the award for Book of the Year 2020 was Life and death in the countryside of Roman Britain, by Alexander Smith, Martyn Allen, Tom Brindle, Michael Fulford, Lisa Lodwick, and Anna Rohnbogner, published by the Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies.

This final volume in the New Visions of the Countryside of Roman Britain series concentrates on poorer rural populations, exploring evidence for themes including clothing, diet, religion, and health, and offering detailed insights into life in Britain during the Roman occupation.

Accepting the award on behalf of the project, Professor Michael Fulford (University of Reading) said: ‘It’s a wonderful tribute to an amazing project, and it’s lovely to have recognition for the final volume of the project.’

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For a full list of the nominees, visit www.archaeology.co.uk/awards


Notes for Editors: Current Archaeology Awards

  • Current Archaeology, the UK’s leading archaeology magazine, announced the winners of their 2020 awards, presented by archaeologist and educator Julian Richards (who previously headed the popular archaeological television programme Meet the Ancestors) on February 28, as part of the annual Current Archaeology Live! 2020 conference, held at the University of London’s Senate House.
  • Voted for by subscribers and members of the public, the awards recognise the outstanding contributions to our understanding of the past made by the people, projects, and publications featured in the pages of Current Archaeology over the previous 12 months.
  • The 2020 Current Archaeology Award for Book of the Year was sponsored by Butser Ancient Farm.
  • Life and death in the countryside of Roman Britain  was reviewed in Current Archaeology 347.

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