Press

The 10th annual Current Archaeology Awards were held on the 23 February, as part of Current Archaeology Live! 2018.

For photos of the award winners, click here.

Individual press releases for each of the winners can be found in full below.
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PRESS RELEASE: Professor Roberta Gilchrist wins prestigious Archaeologist of the Year award for 2016

  Top honours for Archaeologist of the Year at the prestigious Current Archaeology Awards went to Professor Roberta Gilchrist. A pioneer in social approaches to medieval archaeology, she has addressed new questions on gender, age, and belief, and has published numerous major studies on medieval nunneries, hospitals, castles and burials. Her recently published monograph Glastonbury Abbey: archaeological excavations 1904-1979 […]

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PRESS RELEASE: Drumclay crannog wins prestigious Rescue Dig of the Year award for 2016

Nora Bermingham and Caitríona Moore accept Current Archaeology’s prestigious Rescue Dig of the Year award for 2016, for their work on the Drumclay crannog The award for Rescue Dig of the Year was accepted by Dr Nora Bermingham and Caitríona Moore who carried out the rare excavation of a crannog (a medieval artificial island) in Co. Fermanagh on behalf […]

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Current Archaeology Awards 2015 – Photos

The below photos were taken at the Current Archaeology Awards 2015, held at the University of London’s Senate House as part of the Current Archaeology Live! 2015 conference on 27-28 February 2015. Each image below is to be credited to Current Archaeology/Mark Edwards The image below is to be credited to Current Archaeology/Aerial-Cam

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PRESS RELEASE: Ian Haynes and Tony Wilmott win Current Archaeology’s prestigious Research Project of the Year award for 2015, for their work at Maryport

Top honours for  Research Project of the Year  at the prestigious Current Archaeology Awards went to Professor Ian Haynes and Tony Wilmott, Newcastle University. They were recognised for their work at Maryport, a  research project initiated and funded by the Senhouse Museum Trust, where ongoing excavations at the 2nd century Roman fort have revealed the […]

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PRESS RELEASE: The Happisburgh Project wins Current Archaeology’s prestigious Rescue Dig of the Year award for 2015, for revealing the earliest evidence of human activity in Britain.

Top honours for  Rescue Dig of the Year  at the prestigious Current Archaeology Awards went to  the Happisburgh Project team for their work at Happisburgh on the Norfolk coast. Their investigations at this remarkable site has revealed tangible traces of some of Britain’s earliest known human inhabitants, including a series of footprints dating back almost […]

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