Issues

CA-315---out-now!

Current Archaeology 315

A recent excavation campaign at Binchester Roman fort concluded with a spectacular discovery. A trench revealed part of a bathhouse that may be one of the best-preserved structures surviving from Roman Britain. Traces of garish frescoes still cling to walls standing above head height, which bear witness to refurbishments that kept pace with the garrison’s demand for creature comforts. We […]

Current Archaeology 314 - out now!

Current Archaeology 314

Twelve thousand years ago, Britain was joined to Europe by a great plain, where Mesolithic people lived and hunted. But as water levels rose, their home was submerged beneath the North Sea. What did this loss of place mean for the wave of migrants it created? Mobility of another kind is under the microscope elsewhere in this issue, as an […]

Current Archaeology 313 - out-now!

Current Archaeology 313

Mention Iron Age settlement, and most people’s minds turn to hillforts, oppida, or even the evocatively named banjo enclosures. One thing all of these sites have in common is earthworks that encircle or at least sketch out the bounds of occupation. ‘Duropolis’ is different. Excavations at Winterborne Kingston are revealing a dense cluster of roundhouses […]

Current Archaeology-312---out-now!

Current Archaeology 312

It is the immediacy of Must Farm’s archaeology that is so startling. Walking around the site it is easy to believe that the embers have barely cooled following the disaster that overtook the settlement. Instead, the charred and tumbled vestiges of roundhouses lay in Fenland silts for almost 3,000 years. This stunning preservation will bring Late Bronze Age building techniques […]

Current Archaeology 311---out-now!

Current Archaeology 311

Monty Python’s pithy question ‘What have the Romans ever done for us?’ cuts to the heart of the pros and cons of conquest. Debate about how Britons fared under Roman rule weighs the balance between exploitation and opportunity, but rarely strays into the arena of overseas travel. There is little sign in ancient texts that Britons enthusiastically seized their chance […]

Current Archaeology 310 - out-now!

Current Archaeology 310

Archaeology is all about teasing out hidden details. At Verulamium, the site of the Roman city scrutinised during recent investigations is conspicuous enough, but its streets and city blocks have long since grassed over. Now geophysical survey has laid bare one of the great cities of Roman Britain. On Anglesey, a project is seeking to […]

Current Archaeology 309-out-now!

Current Archaeology 309

Visiting some of Britain’s wilder landscapes today, it can be easy to overlook the mouldering machinery of past heavy industry, and the scars incised by mineral extraction. Such abstraction must have required greater mental agility in the 18th- and 19th-century Mendip Hills, though, when Romantic poets and artists seeking rural inspiration found that the Industrial […]

Current Archaeology 308-out-now!

Current Archaeology 308

In March 1665 the London sailed up the Thames to collect her captain. Although this ship was laden with munitions, ready for action in the Second Anglo-Dutch War, her Thames voyage provided an opportunity for a pleasure cruise. Numerous ladies were on board when the London’s powder store was accidentally ignited, sending the ship – […]

CA-307---out-now!

Current Archaeology 307

We are used to seeing the Celts through the filter of Greek and Roman propaganda. Ancient writers poke fun at the luxuriant moustaches sported by Celtic warriors, and cast them as the barbaric foils to Classical civilisation. Celtic art, though, tells a different story. Hidden among its graceful curves and elegant motifs are elusive abstract […]

CA-306---out-now!

Current Archaeology 306

Cliffs End Farm; Welsh Slate; Excavating Barrow Clump; England’s Vanishing Heritage; Butser Ancient Farm; plus much more.

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