Special Tudor Edition

CA 218 Tudor Special

The Tudor dynasty ruled England from 1485 to 1603: chock-full of colourful characters and big events, the Tudor continue to capture modern attention in popular films, stage productions and literature.  The film The Other Boleyn Girl  is a perfect example of just how much we enjoy imagining the bodice-ripping adventures that accompanied this defining moment in history. In addition to endless tales of intrigue, romance and betrayal, the Tudors were responsible for truly defining moments in political culture, religion, art and architecture. In this issue, we examine how some of their innovations manifested themselves in sumptuous improvements to manorial homes, extensive landscaping, and the famous Mary Rose. Additionally, we have a rare first-hand account of the indomitable will of Henry VIII, and at what cost came resistance.  And this issue would not be complete without the review of the recent film, and an examination of just why heads rolled so frequently during the century or so that the Tudors ruled England.

 


FEATURES

 

THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF A REVOLUTIONARY EPOCH

Features Editor Neil Faulkner sets the stage for our special issue on the archaeology of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn’s world.  

 

ACTON COURT

Once the lovenest of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, this Gloucestershire farmhouse fell into ruin.  Now restored, Neil Faulkner examines its history and the extraordinary cost of Royal favour at the Tudor Court.

MARY ROSE

Chris Catling details the finds, and profiles the plans for the new museum that will display them.

 

ROCHE ABBEY: THE DISSOLUTION OF THE MONASTERIES

A rare contemporary account of the speed and completeness wih which a proud monastery could be brought low.  

 

QUARRENDON

Sir Henry Lee, a leading Elizabethan courtier, created a landscaping masterpiece on his manorial estate to honour an anticipated visit by his queen.  

 

COPPED HALL

Now a major restoration project, this ‘lost’ Tudor mansion was once part of a 16th century building boom in the south-east, as the politically ambitions sought to establish themselves close to the Royal Court.  

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