Congratulations to Sands of Time: domestic rituals at the Links of Noltland, winner of the Rescue Dig of the Year category in the Current Archaeology Awards 2014.

Richard-Strachan

Richard Strachan (left) accepting the award for Rescue Dig of the Year from Matt Symonds (right), Editor of Current Archaeology.

 

The award for Rescue Dig of the Year was accepted by Richard Strachan on behalf of EASE Archaeology and Historic Scotland for their work at the Links of Noltland in Orkney. This remarkable site is contemporary with the celebrated Ness of Brodgar’s religious monuments, but with a domestic focus – shedding valuable new light on daily life in prehistoric Orkney.

On accepting the award, Richard Strachan said: ‘It is fantastic to have won this award — it is a great endorsement of the project, and represents an important recognition of the national and international significance of the Links of Noltland — and the hard work of all the archaeologists involved in the investigations there.’

 

 

 

Below are all the nominees in this category:

 


Sands of Time: domestic rituals at the Links of Noltland

(CA 275 — Historic Scotland/EASE Archaeology)

This remarkable site, contemporary with the Ness of Brodgar’s religious monuments, sheds valuable new light on domestic life in prehistoric Orkney.

Click here to read the full article


Divide and Conquer: Hadrian’s Wall and the indigenous population

(CA 277 — Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums)

Dramatic new findings suggest that constructing Hadrian’s Wall went hand in hand with stamping out centuries-old local farming communities.

Click here to read the full article


London’s Pompeii: the rise and fall of a Roman waterfront

(CA 280 — Museum of London Archaeology)

Excavation in the heart of Roman London has uncovered the remains of timber buildings and over 10,000 artefacts.

Click here to read the full article


Corinium’s Dead: excavating the Tetbury Road Roman cemetery

(CA 281 — Cotswold Archaeology)

A burial ground just outside Roman Cirencester has given the clearest glimpse in 40 years of the city’s inhabitants.

Click here to read the full article


Discovering Longforth Farm: on the trail of a Medieval mystery

(CA 283 — Wessex Archaeology)

Finding a magnificent but undocumented Medieval building complex sparked archaeological detective work.

Click here to read the full article


The Ebbsfleet Elephant: making a killing in the Thames Estuary

(CA 284 — Oxford Archaeology)

A 400,000-year-old elephant butchery ground has brought the Palaeolithic Thames Valley vividly to life once more.

Click here to read the full article


 

2 Comments

  1. Conrad Broadley
    December 9, 2013 @ 11:28 pm

    How about Rosherville Gardens Bear Pit, Italian Garden and garden cave, a miraculous find based on the hunch of an amateur?

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    April 10, 2015 @ 9:44 am

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