Congratulations to  Folkestone: Roman villa or Iron Age  oppidum?, winner of the Rescue Dig of the Year category in the Current Archaeology Awards  2013.

Keith Parfitt, of Canterbury Archaeological Trust, who won this year's prize for Rescue Dig of the Year, for the Trust's work at Folkestone Roman villa, presented at the prestigious Current Archaeology Awards

Keith Parfitt, of Canterbury Archaeological Trust, who won this year’s prize for Rescue Dig of the Year for the Trust’s work at Folkestone Roman villa, presented at the prestigious Current Archaeology Awards

First examined  in 1924, coastal erosion prompted a re-examination of the site before it was lost forever.  Lead by Canterbury Archaeological Trust, this excavation revealed that the villa overlay a major Iron Age port of trade receiving large quantities of imported high status continental goods.

Keith Parfitt, who accepted the award on behalf of the Trust,  said: ‘The people of Folkestone will be so pleased to see this project recognised. Prior to our excavations, no one had seen the villa for 50 years so it was great that the local community could visit the site during our excavations.

 ‘Rescue archaeology is so important, and all of the projects nominated this year would have been worthy of winning — they all deserve recognition.’

 

Below are all the nominees in this category:


Folkestone Roman villa or Iron Age oppidum?

(CA 262 — Canterbury Archaeological Trust)
A race against time to excavate an eroding cliffside site revealed  clues to an Iron Age story underlying the Roman remains.


Waterworld: Must Farm’s Bronze Age boats

(CA 263 — Cambridge Archaeological Unit)
Six spectacular Bronze Age boats and an intact prehistoric riverbank  allow vivid insights into life in a changing world.


Lankhills: late Roman Winchester

(CA 266 — Oxford Archaeology)
Cemetery excavations shed light on Roman identities, revealing  the remains of dignitaries, overseas visitors, and outcasts.


The first East Enders

(CA 269 — Museum of London Archaeology/Wessex Archaeology/Preconstruct Archaeology)
The new Olympic Park provided unprecedented opportunities  for excavation, producing10,000 finds spanning 10,000 years.


London’s volcanic winter

(CA 270 — Museum of London Archaeology)
Mass graves from the world’s largest excavated cemetery, and  how a massive volcanic eruption devastated Medieval London.


Roman Faverdale

(CA 273 — Pre-construct Archaeology)
Reshaping ideas about entrepreneurial opportunities for native  Britons in the Roman north


 

Voting has now closed, and the winners will be announced at  Current Archaeology Live! 2013.    For more information about the event,  click here.

 

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