Author: CA

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THE PROBLEM OF THE PICTS

The Picts are a fascinating but archaeologically elusive people who thrived in parts of Scotland in the 4th to 10th centuries AD. What has recent research added to this often obscure picture? Gordon Noble reports.

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Current Archaeology 364

I hope you’re all well! It has been lovely hearing from so many of you over the past few weeks – what is clear during these ‘interesting times’ is that, although we’re currently apart, the archaeological world is still very much a community. Hopefully we will be together again soon – and while many heritage […]

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Review – Manufactured Bodies: the impact of industrialisation on London health

Forged from a project funded by the City of London Archaeological Trust, this volume weaves together archaeological, historical, and modern-day public health data, resulting in an impressive resource for understanding the health of Londoners past and present. Focusing on data collected from human skeletal remains of nearly 2,400 individuals from 24 pre-industrial (1066–1750) and industrial (1750–1900) sites across Britain, it implements cutting-edge digital radiographic and computerised tomography (CT) analysis on an unprecedented scale.

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Review – A Prehistoric Burial Mound and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Barrow Clump, Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire: English Heritage and Operation Nightingale excavations 2003-14

Excavations at Barrow Clump, Figheldean, by English Heritage in 2003–2004, were designed to ascertain the extent of damage to a round barrow caused by the activity of badgers. In this book, the illustrations alone, which depict the pre-barrow soil riddled with burrows, serve to emphasise that it was considerable. Further excavations, by the Defence Infrastructure Organisation and Wessex Archaeology in 2012–2014, aimed to alleviate damage to a series of Anglo-Saxon graves set around the barrow and, given the circumstances, the results are remarkable.

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Review – Twelfth-century Sculptural Sculptural Finds at Canterbury Cathedral

As a mere ‘worked stone specialist’, it was with some trepidation that I took on the task of reviewing a book dealing with matters striking at the very heart of Romanesque art scholarship. The Medieval Academy of America saw the establishment of a largely female tradition of American scholarship, of which this book’s author, Professor Malone, is a part.

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THE MONASTERY BEFORE THE MARKET

St Mary Spital was London’s first religious house founded by Londoners. Between 1197 and 1539, the Augustinian priory flourished, developing from a small roadside hospital into a large institution serving the capital’s poor and sick – a story brought to light by almost two decades of excavations, as Susan M Wright reports.

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Minerva magazine offer for CA subscribers

Special Offer: CA  subscribers can get 25% off a subscription to our sister magazine, Minerva. In January this year, Current Archaeology gained a new sister publication – Minerva – a bi-monthly magazine that showcases the beauty and sophistication of ancient cultures, and the ways they continue to inspire us today. For over 30 years, Minerva has […]

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INDUSTRY, COMMERCE, AND THE URBAN POOR

In the early 18th century, Avon Street was built to accommodate wealthy visitors to Bath’s fashionable spa waters. Within half a century, though, the area had degenerated into a notorious slum and red-light district. What have recent excavations revealed about the lives of its impoverished inhabitants?

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Current Archaeology 363

I hope you’re all keeping well. What a different world we find ourselves in since I wrote last month’s letter! They say that ‘the past is a foreign country’, and it certainly seems bizarre that only a few weeks ago we were compiling our annual ‘Digs Guide’ listings of summer excavations. But while many outdoor […]

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Review – Ruins and Follies of East Anglia

This is a book you will want in your pocket if you are going for a stroll in East Anglia. Through his writing, Edward Couzens-Lake – a passionate explorer of Norwich – accompanies the reader to 45 sites, each of which is given a concise historical description and photographs.

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