Author: CA

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Provenancing the stones

Where did the Stonehenge bluestones come from? Scientific advances are allowing us to pinpoint the outcrops that they were quarried from with ever-greater accuracy. Rob Ixer, Richard Bevins, and Duncan Pirrie describe some of the latest thinking.

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Current Archaeology 366

Last summer, we ran a feature about the long-running excavation at Poulton, near Chester, which was then exploring a cemetery associated with a medieval farming community. Within the grave fills, however, the team found far older artefacts: hints of earlier occupation. Now they have revealed the remains of a completely unexpected Iron Age and Romano-British […]

Rock-art-landscapes

Review – The Rock-art Landscapes of Rombalds Moor, West Yorkshire: standing on holy ground

What are we to make of the strange abstract patterns – cup marks and cups and rings – pecked into boulders and outcrops in upland areas? Can they be compared with similar designs on specialised monuments like stone circles, cists, and megalithic tombs? In that case, their wider significance can be investigated. Or is a clue provided by the choice of rock for these strange designs? If so, they can be treated as parts of the landscape.

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Current Archaeology 365

Our cover story takes us to the territory of the Iron Age Brigantes, in what is now North Yorkshire. There, major works on the A1 have revealed extensive settlement remains, telling a powerful story of how a community’s first contacts with the Roman Empire brought unprecedented prosperity, but also set wheels in motion for the […]

Houses-of-the-Dead

Review – Houses of the Dead?

This volume, the 17th published by Oxbow on behalf of the Neolithic Studies Group, returns to two interrelated questions that have long been debated by archaeologists interested in Britain’s earliest monuments. The first is: do the wooden structures associated with long barrows represent ‘houses for the dead’?

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Review – A Riverine Site Near York: a possible Viking camp?

This report is about one of the most important Viking sites in England – one that remains shrouded in some confusion and secrecy. Mark Ainsley and Geoff Bambrook had been metal-detecting at the site (known here as ARSNY) since 1996, but it first came to archaeological attention in late 2003 when they approached the Yorkshire Museum with what was described as a Viking hoard.

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