Author: Lucia Marchini

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Glastonbury Abbey: the archaeological story

Excavators were repeatedly drawn to Glastonbury Abbey during the 20th century, but the fruits of their labours rarely made it into print. Roberta Gilchrist is spearheading a major project to separate archaeological fact from the rich mythology the abbey attracts.   The site of Glastonbury Abbey in Somerset is inscribed with legends that are at […]

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Current Archaeology 320

Glastonbury has a knack of attracting stories. It is a place where legends of a once and future king and feet in ancient time provide a beguiling backdrop to remarkable archaeological remains. The ruins of Glastonbury Abbey enticed a succession of investigators in the 20th century, but all of them left their endeavours incompletely published. […]

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Hadrian’s Wall: 3 days, 300 people, 40 years of research

More than 300 people came along to celebrate 40 years of Hadrian’s Wall research at our special conference on 2-4 September, organised in partnership with Durham University and sponsored by Andante Travels. The celebratory weekend began on Friday with a tour to Vindolanda and Housesteads with Andante Travels, led by expert guides Mark Corney and David […]

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Time Truck: London’s local archaeology

Today (Friday 9 September) is MOLA’s Time Truck’s last day at Bishops Square. Surrounded by tall commercial buildings, behind the high-end cosmetics shops of Old Spitalfields Market, the pop-up exhibition offers a chance to explore everyday life in east London in the 17th-19th centuries. With staff from MOLA on hand to explain the selection of […]

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Must Farm: an extraordinary tale of the everyday

The remarkable preservation at Must Farm promised insights into day-to-day life that would revolutionise our knowledge of the late Bronze Age. As excavations at the site reach completion, it is already clear that we will never see that era in the same way again. Mark Knight, Susanna Harris, and Grahame Appleby told Matthew Symonds about […]

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Current Archaeology 319

We now know that disaster swiftly struck Must Farm. Construction may not even have been complete when the flames took hold, and it is probable that the settlement was gutted within a year of being founded. For the inhabitants, the loss of their homes and possessions must have been devastating, but the archaeological windfall has […]

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Book Review: Bearsden – A Roman Fort on the Antonine Wall

Bearsden: A Roman fort on the Antonine Wall David J Breeze Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, £30.00 ISBN 978-1908332080 Bearsden presents a challenge to anyone who believes that Roman forts are much of a muchness. This military base once formed part of a cordon of forts strung out along the length of the Antonine Wall, a frontier system […]

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The archaeology of the domestic cat

Of mousers and men When did cats graduate from convenient pest-control to one of the world’s most popular pets, and how can you tell the difference in the archaeological record? The answer, John Buglass and Jennifer West suggest, may lie in Roman Yorkshire. Today, the image of a pet cat purring on its owner’s lap […]

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Orkney: A tale of two Neolithics?

Investigating the evolution of house societies in Orkney For decades, the accepted view of the Orcadian Neolithic was one of two cultural packages with a sharp break in the middle. New research has revealed a much more complex and nuanced picture, however. Carly Hilts spoke to Colin Richards to find out more. The traditional understanding of the Neolithic period […]

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Current Archaeology 318

Neolithic tombs are often seen as ‘houses for the dead’. Striking similarities between the residences of the living and repositories for the deceased have long suggested a symbolic link, but could it be the other way round? Evidence from Orkney suggests that the departed were being laid to rest in their cairns for about 300 […]

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