Author: Kathryn Krakowka

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Review – Viking: rediscover the legend

An exhibition tracing the Vikings through the British Isles has reached the final stop on its two-year tour. Lucia Marchini headed to Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery to learn more about Norsemen in Norfolk and beyond.

Quarrying-in-Cumbria

Review – Quarrying in Cumbria

This small but fascinating book tells the story of quarrying, or ‘stone-getting’, in Cumbria, from prehistoric to modern times. David Johnson uses photographs accompanied by extended captions to reveal how slate, granite, limestone, clay, and gypsum were extracted from rock faces or dug out of the ground.

Freshwater-Fish-in-England

Review – Freshwater Fish in England

This book provides an eminently readable overview of freshwater fishing, redressing the focus on sea fishing that has dominated archaeological narratives in recent years. The author is a leading fish-bone specialist, so there is mention of archaeological data, including isotopic analyses of human bones as proxies for diet.

Finds-Identified

Review – Finds Identified

This new book, Finds Identified, is a chunky volume celebrating the rich material culture of England and Wales. Brimming with information on archaeological objects dating from the prehistoric to the modern period, it is richly illustrated with images from the online database of the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS).

Capt-Matthew-Flinders-breast-plate-cleaned

Finding Captain Flinders at Euston

Archaeologists have identified the grave of the 19th-century explorer Matthew Flinders while excavating at Euston Station as part of the HS2 scheme.

JimKeebleA1MercuryTheatreColchester2018_

Roman ruins revealed under the Mercury Theatre

Recent excavations in Colchester, a town renowned for its rich Roman archaeology, have revealed more evidence from this period, spanning from the time of the AD 43 conquest of Britain into the 2nd century and beyond.

Sweet-chestnut-5-Historic-England

That old chestnut: how sweet chestnuts came to Britain

It has long been thought that sweet chestnut trees were introduced to Britain by the Romans – a belief popularised by 18th-century writers – but new research assessing archaeobotanical samples from this period has now cast doubt on such assumptions.

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