Author: Kathryn Krakowka

ca_OUTNOWbanner_new

Current Archaeology 332

The year is on the turn. As summer slips undeniably into autumn, it is a time of new beginnings, not only thanks to the changing seasons but also to our associating these months with the start of the new school or university year. There have been changes afoot at CA too; as we drift towards […]

aerial pic landscape

Wales’ earliest village?

Exploring a Neolithic neighbourhood at Llanfaethlu Since 2014, archaeological work at Llanfaethlu, on the north coast of Anglesey, has been revealing the remains of the first early Neolithic multi-house settlement to be found in north Wales. Catherine Rees and Matthew Jones explain further. When our work began at Llanfaethlu, the site had already been identified […]

Sharpes-pottery-250x300

Council for Independent Archaeology conference 2017

The Council for Independent Archaeology 2017 conference will be held at the Sharpes Pottery Museum in Swadlincote, Derbyshire on Sunday, October 22nd. While most of the programme has already been arranged, there are still a few slots available. If you are interested in presenting or just attending, please contact Keith Foster (skfoster@btinternet.com). The fee is £20, […]

UC_70 Control Room_(c)Crown Copyright

Protecting historic wrecks

Two shipwreck sites spanning some 300 years and lying 280 miles apart have been safeguarded under the Protection of Wrecks Act 1973. Off Chesil Beach in Dorset, the remains of two vessels 200m apart were found by divers from the Weymouth-based Shipwreck Project in 2010. Thought to be wooden merchant vessels, they held 15 cast-iron […]

image1

Clues to catastrophe at Clachtoll Broch

A community project at Clachtoll Broch, in north-west Scotland, is piecing together the story of a catastrophic event that saw the 2,000-year-old stone tower’s entrance sealed off during the Iron Age. Brochs are unique to Scotland, but this example – which may have once stood 14m high – is particularly special, the project team reports, […]

01_KH_Blair_Ardoch_July_2017

Henge found at Blair Ardoch Farm?

A potential henge site has been discovered in North Ayrshire, thanks to aerial photography. Jeni Park of Kilwinning Heritage was browsing the National Library of Scotland’s online resources when she spotted two large concentric circles at Blair Ardoch Farm. Consultation with Dr Ralph Shuttleworth, another member of Kilwinning Heritage, identified the 60m-wide circles as probable […]

IMG_8330

Boxford’s mythological mosaic revealed

A community project near Boxford in Berkshire has uncovered the remains of a late Roman villa containing what has been hailed as ‘the most exciting mosaic discovery made in Britain in the last 50 years’. The HLF-funded project ‘Revealing Boxford’s Ancient Heritage’ is a collaboration between the Boxford History Project, Berkshire Archaeology Research Group, and […]

Stenness from E

Revolutionising chronologies of Neolithic Orkney

Orkney has long been renowned for its wealth of well preserved Neolithic sites, such as Skara Brae, and it seems that much is known about the time and region. But a new study by a team at Historic England has set out to challenge our current understanding of the chronology of the period by compiling […]

Larkhill_MG_sketchfab model

Motoring mystery on Salisbury Plain

Archaeologists working on Salisbury Plain are used to unearthing enigmatic remains, thanks to the area’s rich array of prehistoric ritual sites. Wessex Archaeology’s work at Larkhill (see CA 326 and 328) has turned up a more unexpected discovery, however: the remains of a 1932 MG J2 car. The vehicle was found in a former WWII […]

Cavalry Junction Strap just found image (c) The Vindolanda Trust

Vindolanda’s cavalry cache uncovered

The long-running excavations at Vindolanda, a Roman auxiliary fort just south of Hadrian’s Wall, have uncovered an apparently hastily abandoned cavalry barracks containing a wealth of finds, from weapons to personal items. The Vindolanda Trust-led investigations had opened test-pits beneath the stone foundations of the last stone fortress, revealing anaerobic layers dating from c.AD 120, […]