Reviews

Seahenge--A-Journey

Review – Seahenge: a journey

Terse, heightened prose relates a set of nested journeys: a Beaker chief to his death and hinted excarnation, his daughter with his body to death-rites at Woodhenge, and the poet’s pilgrimage from his Cotswold heimat to Holme-next-the-Sea on the East Anglian coast.

The-Prehistory-of-Britain-and-Ireland

Review – The Prehistory of Britain and Ireland

This is a thoroughly revised, weighty second edition, and can be regarded as a companion piece to Richard Bradley’s recently co-authored and more broadly focused The Later Prehistory of North-west Europe (2015). This book concentrates on those few islands on the western fringes, blinking in and out of Europe, and proceeds to examine their history closely.

Personifying-Prehistory

Review – Personifying Prehistory: relational ontologies in Bronze Age Britain and Ireland

Professor Joanna Brück has produced a fresh textbook of the Bronze Age that builds a complex picture of the period from the personal up to the broader landscape in Britain and Ireland. Joanna explores the period through the intricacies of the relationships between people, objects, structures, and landscapes. This contrasts with the standard approach, which focuses on overviews and the ‘bigger picture’, often framed by questions of power and control.

The--Prittlewell-princely-burial

Review – The Prittlewell princely burial: excavations at Priory Crescent, 2003

In 2003, an excavation by MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) discovered a spectacular Anglo-Saxon burial chamber at Prittlewell, near Southend-on-Sea. Since then, expert analysis of the burial and its contents has indeed yielded a vast array of new information – the result of which is this absorbing monograph, which is packed with insights from the scientific studies that have been undertaken on the finds.

23-01--01-01--Linda-Brothwell-Conversations-in-Making-Image-Jo-Hounsome-Photography-copy

Review – Conversations in making

Contemporary art is on view at Stonehenge’s visitor centre for the first time. Lucia Marchini went along to take a look and find out more about an artistic approach to archaeology.

The-Archaeology-of-Roman-York (1)

Review – The Archaeology of Roman York

On this whistle-stop tour of Roman York, Adam Parker gives us a tale of two cities. One is the military fortress, which was established in AD 70 or 71 and would shape the growth of the city long after the Romans left. Then there was the colonia, the civilian settlement that developed on the other side of the river. Over time, it acquired all the necessities of a grand city: public baths, townhouses decorated with mosaics, temples, monumental tombs that lined the roads into the city, and, possibly, an amphitheatre.

Raasay

Review – Raasay: the ACFA archaeological surveys 1995-2009

The Isle of Raasay is in sharp focus in Scottish culture. It is the place whose cleared settlements informed Sorley MacLean’s important Gaelic poem Hallaig. It is the landscape where Calum MacLeod spent ten years in the 1960s and 1970s hand-building a road to keep his community connected.

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